Presentation Title

Understanding the relationship of rumination and alcohol dependency in the clinical setting.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-14

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Rumination, the tendency to dwell on past failures or negative experiences, has been correlated with substance use and shown to be a predictor of future substance use in women. Research suggests that alcohol may be used to temporarily diminish the undesirable effects of rumination. To better understand the relationship between rumination and alcohol use we investigated SUD patients level of rumination at baseline, as well as the effects of rumination in treating SUD patients. Utilizing the ruminative response scale (RRS) we compared our baseline sample (n = 58) to a previous study (n = 1,132) that compiled the average rumination scores in men and women (Nolen-Hoeksema et al, 1999). We analyzed data from SUD patients (n = 21) with at least three months of treatment to determine the relationship of change in rumination and alcohol dependency, measured with the alcohol dependency scale (ADS). Rumination levels for baseline SUD patients were significantly higher when compared to the average population, women (p = .0005) and men (p < .0001). Contrary to previous findings there was no significant difference of male and female rumination levels (p = 0.96). Comparison of change in RRS and ADS from baseline to three month follow up provided a significant positive correlation (p < .05). These findings support previous research on the relationship of rumination and alcohol use. High levels of rumination in men may be more predictive of alcohol use than previous research has suggested. Additionally, lowering rumination in the treatment of SUD patients may help to improve patterns of alcohol use.

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Understanding the relationship of rumination and alcohol dependency in the clinical setting.

HUB 302-14

Rumination, the tendency to dwell on past failures or negative experiences, has been correlated with substance use and shown to be a predictor of future substance use in women. Research suggests that alcohol may be used to temporarily diminish the undesirable effects of rumination. To better understand the relationship between rumination and alcohol use we investigated SUD patients level of rumination at baseline, as well as the effects of rumination in treating SUD patients. Utilizing the ruminative response scale (RRS) we compared our baseline sample (n = 58) to a previous study (n = 1,132) that compiled the average rumination scores in men and women (Nolen-Hoeksema et al, 1999). We analyzed data from SUD patients (n = 21) with at least three months of treatment to determine the relationship of change in rumination and alcohol dependency, measured with the alcohol dependency scale (ADS). Rumination levels for baseline SUD patients were significantly higher when compared to the average population, women (p = .0005) and men (p < .0001). Contrary to previous findings there was no significant difference of male and female rumination levels (p = 0.96). Comparison of change in RRS and ADS from baseline to three month follow up provided a significant positive correlation (p < .05). These findings support previous research on the relationship of rumination and alcohol use. High levels of rumination in men may be more predictive of alcohol use than previous research has suggested. Additionally, lowering rumination in the treatment of SUD patients may help to improve patterns of alcohol use.