Presentation Title

Generating a Heparin Substitute Using Sulfated Virus Nanoparticles

Presenter Information

Eric M. Moll IIFollow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-84

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Heparin is a widely used anticoagulant in medicine. The global market for heparin has grown to over $4 billion in the 89 years since discovery. Heparin’s widespread use comes at a cost, however. Heparin contributes to 7,000 deaths by overdose per year. In 2008, Baxter Healthcare Corporation had to recall multi-dose and single dose vials of heparin due to contamination. The dangers posed by heparin are a consequence of the molecule's heterogeneity. The structure of the heparin molecule is a highly sulfated polymer containing long chains of sugars called glycosaminoglycans. Precise arrangement of the sulfate groups dictates the biological activity of heparin. In previous years there has been research into attaching sulfated ligands to bacteriophage in known configurations with the goal of generating a heparin substitute. Continuing along these lines, the work herein seeks to create sulfated dendrons by "click chemistry" to further evaluate the potential of sulfated bacteriophage as a heparin alternative.

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Generating a Heparin Substitute Using Sulfated Virus Nanoparticles

HUB 302-84

Heparin is a widely used anticoagulant in medicine. The global market for heparin has grown to over $4 billion in the 89 years since discovery. Heparin’s widespread use comes at a cost, however. Heparin contributes to 7,000 deaths by overdose per year. In 2008, Baxter Healthcare Corporation had to recall multi-dose and single dose vials of heparin due to contamination. The dangers posed by heparin are a consequence of the molecule's heterogeneity. The structure of the heparin molecule is a highly sulfated polymer containing long chains of sugars called glycosaminoglycans. Precise arrangement of the sulfate groups dictates the biological activity of heparin. In previous years there has been research into attaching sulfated ligands to bacteriophage in known configurations with the goal of generating a heparin substitute. Continuing along these lines, the work herein seeks to create sulfated dendrons by "click chemistry" to further evaluate the potential of sulfated bacteriophage as a heparin alternative.