Presentation Title

Improving the Limit of Detection and Reliability of Fiber Optic Biosensors Embedded within Microfluidic Channels

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-46

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Simple, cost-efficient, and sensitive biosensors have great potential for detection in food safety, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics. Label-free fiber optic biosensors do not use any fluorescent tags for detection. Instead, we analyze spectral shifts of the peaks formed due to interference of light waves. We fabricate sensors by tapering optical glass fibers and using them as interferometers. As the sensor is introduced to different solutions with different refractive indices, spectral peak shifts follow. Tapered fiber optic sensors are connected to a light source and a spectrum analyzer for measurement. Here we investigate the results of free space sensor orientation with the PDMS embedded fiber. When the sensor is embedded within a microfluidic channel, the sensor surface may come into in contact with other surfaces other than the solution. Therefore, the spectrum produces false responses, deteriorating the limit of detection. However, free space sensors are fragile and difficult to manufacture. We are investigating an optimal method to fabricate the sensors within a microfluidic channel to improve the limit of detection and reliability.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Improving the Limit of Detection and Reliability of Fiber Optic Biosensors Embedded within Microfluidic Channels

HUB 302-46

Simple, cost-efficient, and sensitive biosensors have great potential for detection in food safety, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics. Label-free fiber optic biosensors do not use any fluorescent tags for detection. Instead, we analyze spectral shifts of the peaks formed due to interference of light waves. We fabricate sensors by tapering optical glass fibers and using them as interferometers. As the sensor is introduced to different solutions with different refractive indices, spectral peak shifts follow. Tapered fiber optic sensors are connected to a light source and a spectrum analyzer for measurement. Here we investigate the results of free space sensor orientation with the PDMS embedded fiber. When the sensor is embedded within a microfluidic channel, the sensor surface may come into in contact with other surfaces other than the solution. Therefore, the spectrum produces false responses, deteriorating the limit of detection. However, free space sensors are fragile and difficult to manufacture. We are investigating an optimal method to fabricate the sensors within a microfluidic channel to improve the limit of detection and reliability.