Presentation Title

The Salinity of Oil Seeps and Springs in Towsley Canyon, CA

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-131

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Towsley Canyon in Southern California is a popular recreation area with a history of oil and gas production. The Canyon contains saline springs and naturally occurring oil seeps that may pose a risk to shallow dilute waters down-gradient used as a resource. Limited publically available data exists addressing potential source(s) of high salinity and water quality. Therefore, our research questions are: 1) what is/are the possible source(s) of the salinity, and 2) what is the basic water quality of the springs and seeps? Since deep hyper-saline brine is often observed with oil and gas during production, the salinity discharged naturally from seeps and springs is possibly from the Miocene age Modelo formation (source of oil) at depth. To address the source of salinity, water samples from springs and oil seeps were collected from April 2015 to August 2016 and taken to the Hydrogeology/Water Quality Laboratory at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona for analysis by ion chromatography (Dionex ICS 1100). Results indicate chloride ranged from 224-1899 mg/L, well above the EPA secondary standard of 250 mg/L for drinking water. Bromide ranged from 0.136-31.2 mg/L. Average bromide in potable groundwater is 0.016 mg/L (EPA, 2014). High bromide and low chloride:bromide ratios may be indicative of a marine source of salinity. Some samples were analyzed for select cations by Inductively-Coupled-Plasma-Optical-Emission-Spectrometry (ICP-OES) at the Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, UC Riverside. The data shows that the water has Barium (0.47-4.81 mg/L) above the EPA standard (2.0 mg/l) and Manganese (0.0006-0.1688 mg/L) above the EPA standard (0.05 mg/L). The water quality in Towsley Canyon goes beyond EPA primary and secondary standards for salinity and select cations, possibly impacting water quality. In order to assist the salinity, more testing of the springs and oil seeps should be conducted and made public domain.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

The Salinity of Oil Seeps and Springs in Towsley Canyon, CA

HUB 302-131

Towsley Canyon in Southern California is a popular recreation area with a history of oil and gas production. The Canyon contains saline springs and naturally occurring oil seeps that may pose a risk to shallow dilute waters down-gradient used as a resource. Limited publically available data exists addressing potential source(s) of high salinity and water quality. Therefore, our research questions are: 1) what is/are the possible source(s) of the salinity, and 2) what is the basic water quality of the springs and seeps? Since deep hyper-saline brine is often observed with oil and gas during production, the salinity discharged naturally from seeps and springs is possibly from the Miocene age Modelo formation (source of oil) at depth. To address the source of salinity, water samples from springs and oil seeps were collected from April 2015 to August 2016 and taken to the Hydrogeology/Water Quality Laboratory at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona for analysis by ion chromatography (Dionex ICS 1100). Results indicate chloride ranged from 224-1899 mg/L, well above the EPA secondary standard of 250 mg/L for drinking water. Bromide ranged from 0.136-31.2 mg/L. Average bromide in potable groundwater is 0.016 mg/L (EPA, 2014). High bromide and low chloride:bromide ratios may be indicative of a marine source of salinity. Some samples were analyzed for select cations by Inductively-Coupled-Plasma-Optical-Emission-Spectrometry (ICP-OES) at the Environmental Chemistry Laboratory, UC Riverside. The data shows that the water has Barium (0.47-4.81 mg/L) above the EPA standard (2.0 mg/l) and Manganese (0.0006-0.1688 mg/L) above the EPA standard (0.05 mg/L). The water quality in Towsley Canyon goes beyond EPA primary and secondary standards for salinity and select cations, possibly impacting water quality. In order to assist the salinity, more testing of the springs and oil seeps should be conducted and made public domain.