Presentation Title

An Analysis of the Feeding Behavioral Preferences of Xenopus laevis Tadpoles

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#54

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) mutants that lack the expression of the gene Cupcake (dSLC5A11) are unable to detect the nutritional composition of their food (Dus et al. 2013). This taste independent mechanism has also been observed in mice (Araujo et al., 2008). Our lab is intrigued by whether this ability is also conserved in amphibians. Following up on previous research from past students, we have continued to modify the experimental designs and taste-dependent assays comparing standard versus sugar-soaked tadpole food – focusing on varying food deprivation times and sugar concentrations. Similar to the flies and mice, our previous findings suggested that wild-type Xenopus laevis tadpoles preferentially eat more metabolizable food; however, data collected from this year did not parallel those findings. We have also identified a potential homolog gene of Cupcake in the X. laevis genomic database. We plan to conduct RT-PCR analysis to find where the potential homolog is expressed.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

An Analysis of the Feeding Behavioral Preferences of Xenopus laevis Tadpoles

HUB 302-#54

Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) mutants that lack the expression of the gene Cupcake (dSLC5A11) are unable to detect the nutritional composition of their food (Dus et al. 2013). This taste independent mechanism has also been observed in mice (Araujo et al., 2008). Our lab is intrigued by whether this ability is also conserved in amphibians. Following up on previous research from past students, we have continued to modify the experimental designs and taste-dependent assays comparing standard versus sugar-soaked tadpole food – focusing on varying food deprivation times and sugar concentrations. Similar to the flies and mice, our previous findings suggested that wild-type Xenopus laevis tadpoles preferentially eat more metabolizable food; however, data collected from this year did not parallel those findings. We have also identified a potential homolog gene of Cupcake in the X. laevis genomic database. We plan to conduct RT-PCR analysis to find where the potential homolog is expressed.