Presentation Title

Glyphosate Effects on Drosophila melanogaster Courtship Behavior

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#110

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Glyphosate is a popular herbicide used in commercial agriculture that is marketed to have zero effect outside from its intended purpose. However, it does have consequences other than preventing weed growth. The herbicide can flow into water runoff and cause chemical imbalances within organisms’ processes. In this experiment, the overall question is if glyphosate has effects on courtship behavior with male Drosophila melanogaster, and if so, is the behavioral change initiated during the larval or adult stages of their cycles. The Drosophila larvae were raised on one of four treatments until they eclosed. Less than five hours after eclosing, the adult virgin males and females were sorted into single sex vails of one of the four different treatments they were raised on, creating 16 variations of treatments. The purpose of this is to determine if larval or adult food type has an effect on the courtship behavior. After seven days to reach maturity, the males and females were grouped together in a mating wheel to court one another and the interactions were recorded. The importance of observing the changes that glyphosate has on courtship behavior with Drosophila is to express the impact of it either being heightened or suppressed. From the data collected, preliminary results suggest that the behavior expressed during courtship was neither heightened or suppressed, leading us to question the levels of glyphosate present in the larval and adult medium. Future tests will be conducted using a precise level of glyphosate to determine if there was enough present to cause any difference in courtship behavior.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Glyphosate Effects on Drosophila melanogaster Courtship Behavior

HUB 302-#110

Glyphosate is a popular herbicide used in commercial agriculture that is marketed to have zero effect outside from its intended purpose. However, it does have consequences other than preventing weed growth. The herbicide can flow into water runoff and cause chemical imbalances within organisms’ processes. In this experiment, the overall question is if glyphosate has effects on courtship behavior with male Drosophila melanogaster, and if so, is the behavioral change initiated during the larval or adult stages of their cycles. The Drosophila larvae were raised on one of four treatments until they eclosed. Less than five hours after eclosing, the adult virgin males and females were sorted into single sex vails of one of the four different treatments they were raised on, creating 16 variations of treatments. The purpose of this is to determine if larval or adult food type has an effect on the courtship behavior. After seven days to reach maturity, the males and females were grouped together in a mating wheel to court one another and the interactions were recorded. The importance of observing the changes that glyphosate has on courtship behavior with Drosophila is to express the impact of it either being heightened or suppressed. From the data collected, preliminary results suggest that the behavior expressed during courtship was neither heightened or suppressed, leading us to question the levels of glyphosate present in the larval and adult medium. Future tests will be conducted using a precise level of glyphosate to determine if there was enough present to cause any difference in courtship behavior.