Presentation Title

Diffracting Data: Analyzing Diffraction Patterns of Magnetically- Recorded Information

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#25

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Data recovery is a time intensive and expensive process. In an attempt to dramatically speed up the data recovery process, we utilized ferrofluid and diffraction patterns to match the data on the hard drive, or coupon, with a two-dimensional diffraction pattern reflected onto a screen. To determine if patterns on the coupon could coincide with diffraction patterns, ferrofluid was coated onto the coupon and a blue laser at an angle 25 degrees of the normal was shone at the coated coupon. In return, the coupon revealed a two-dimensional diffraction pattern. From the pattern, we were able to measure the widths of the slits on the coupon and match those widths with the distance between the diffraction patterns on the screen. By utilizing a spectrometer, microscope, and line camera, the width of the slits is simple to measure and a cost efficient method to analyze 2-D diffraction patterns. It is possible that there are sufficient repeated structures to identify the types of data stored in a particular region of a hard drive which could help reduce time required to recover lost data in cases of hard drive failure or damage.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Diffracting Data: Analyzing Diffraction Patterns of Magnetically- Recorded Information

HUB 302-#25

Data recovery is a time intensive and expensive process. In an attempt to dramatically speed up the data recovery process, we utilized ferrofluid and diffraction patterns to match the data on the hard drive, or coupon, with a two-dimensional diffraction pattern reflected onto a screen. To determine if patterns on the coupon could coincide with diffraction patterns, ferrofluid was coated onto the coupon and a blue laser at an angle 25 degrees of the normal was shone at the coated coupon. In return, the coupon revealed a two-dimensional diffraction pattern. From the pattern, we were able to measure the widths of the slits on the coupon and match those widths with the distance between the diffraction patterns on the screen. By utilizing a spectrometer, microscope, and line camera, the width of the slits is simple to measure and a cost efficient method to analyze 2-D diffraction patterns. It is possible that there are sufficient repeated structures to identify the types of data stored in a particular region of a hard drive which could help reduce time required to recover lost data in cases of hard drive failure or damage.