Presentation Title

Shifts in β-glucosidase activity of Neurospora genotypes due to warming temperatures

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#83

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Because of global warming in boreal and arctic ecosystems, evolutionary trade-offs are likely to occur with microbial communities in these ecosystems. Rising temperatures could result in an increase in microbial enzymatic activity, cell respiration, soil carbon decomposition and therefore an increase in soil CO2 emissions. These responses could lead to a positive feedback loop onto global warming. We are hypothesizing that enzyme production and kinetics may shift by adapting to higher temperatures. Four strains of Neurospora were evolved at either 16 ˚C or 22 ˚C for 1,500 generations in the lab. Evolved strains were then grown for 14 days on either sucrose (labile) or lignin (recalcitrant), at either 16 ˚C or ˚22 C. Using fluorometric techniques, Vmax of β-glucosidase was measured at temperatures: 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, and 34 ˚C. T-Tests were then performed for Vmax values of β-glucosidase activity on all groups with the significance levels set at 0.05. Optimum shifts in β-glucosidase activity occurred due evolution at elevated temperature. Either enzymatic production and/or kinetics of β-glucosidase adapted to the increase in temperature. The increase of enzymatic activity may lead to an increase in CO2 emission via cellular respiration which could have consequences for climate feedbacks if fungi adapt to global warming.

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Shifts in β-glucosidase activity of Neurospora genotypes due to warming temperatures

HUB 302-#83

Because of global warming in boreal and arctic ecosystems, evolutionary trade-offs are likely to occur with microbial communities in these ecosystems. Rising temperatures could result in an increase in microbial enzymatic activity, cell respiration, soil carbon decomposition and therefore an increase in soil CO2 emissions. These responses could lead to a positive feedback loop onto global warming. We are hypothesizing that enzyme production and kinetics may shift by adapting to higher temperatures. Four strains of Neurospora were evolved at either 16 ˚C or 22 ˚C for 1,500 generations in the lab. Evolved strains were then grown for 14 days on either sucrose (labile) or lignin (recalcitrant), at either 16 ˚C or ˚22 C. Using fluorometric techniques, Vmax of β-glucosidase was measured at temperatures: 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, and 34 ˚C. T-Tests were then performed for Vmax values of β-glucosidase activity on all groups with the significance levels set at 0.05. Optimum shifts in β-glucosidase activity occurred due evolution at elevated temperature. Either enzymatic production and/or kinetics of β-glucosidase adapted to the increase in temperature. The increase of enzymatic activity may lead to an increase in CO2 emission via cellular respiration which could have consequences for climate feedbacks if fungi adapt to global warming.