Presentation Title

Integrating Niche Modeling and eDNA to Detect Cryptic Endangered Haliotis

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#52

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Haliotis, also known as abalone, have been considered endangered by the IUCN. In order to start a repopulating attempt we must distinguish which abalone are species and which ones are sub-species. Since abalone are endangered obtaining tissue samples is not feasible. We have counteracted this issue by incorporating Niche Modeling to give us locations along the coast of Southern California to sample at. We will obtain Environmental DNA (eDNA) samples to do further genetic analysis on the mtCOI barcode region to allow us to differentiate species from sub-species. Niche Modeling: Locality data was downloaded from GBIF and combined with data collected by the VRG during reef surveys. Environmental data (such as bathymetry) was downloaded from MARSPEC (Sbrocco and Barber 2013) Maxent (Phillips et al. 2006) was used to create a Niche Model describing the environmental constraints of each species which was projected onto the rest of the map Genetic Analysis: Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (mtCOI) primers were used to start DNA Synthesis. Post-PCR product was outsourced for sequencing. Sequences were analyzed and compared to known sequences on BLAST Results: For each species, the models returned accurate predictions: 1.AUC scores for the test data were close to 1 2.The predicted distributions matched known distributions. Haliotis rufescans are found much more north, while Haliotis corrugata and Haliotis fulgens span similar regions in Southern California Genetic Analysis: Extracted Halioitis rufescans sequences matched up 100% to BLAST sequences

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Integrating Niche Modeling and eDNA to Detect Cryptic Endangered Haliotis

HUB 302-#52

Haliotis, also known as abalone, have been considered endangered by the IUCN. In order to start a repopulating attempt we must distinguish which abalone are species and which ones are sub-species. Since abalone are endangered obtaining tissue samples is not feasible. We have counteracted this issue by incorporating Niche Modeling to give us locations along the coast of Southern California to sample at. We will obtain Environmental DNA (eDNA) samples to do further genetic analysis on the mtCOI barcode region to allow us to differentiate species from sub-species. Niche Modeling: Locality data was downloaded from GBIF and combined with data collected by the VRG during reef surveys. Environmental data (such as bathymetry) was downloaded from MARSPEC (Sbrocco and Barber 2013) Maxent (Phillips et al. 2006) was used to create a Niche Model describing the environmental constraints of each species which was projected onto the rest of the map Genetic Analysis: Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (mtCOI) primers were used to start DNA Synthesis. Post-PCR product was outsourced for sequencing. Sequences were analyzed and compared to known sequences on BLAST Results: For each species, the models returned accurate predictions: 1.AUC scores for the test data were close to 1 2.The predicted distributions matched known distributions. Haliotis rufescans are found much more north, while Haliotis corrugata and Haliotis fulgens span similar regions in Southern California Genetic Analysis: Extracted Halioitis rufescans sequences matched up 100% to BLAST sequences