Presentation Title

Characterization of Bacteria from the MSMU Garden

Start Date

12-11-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

12-11-2016 2:00 PM

Location

HUB 302-190

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Bacteria play important roles in soil ecosystems including the recycling and remineralization of nutrients as well as symbiotic associations with other microbes and plants. The soil microbial community is highly diverse with thousands of species in a single teaspoon of soil. We characterized a portion of the bacterial community in Mount Saint Mary’s University’s garden in an effort to document diversity and explore individual isolate’s physiology and interactions in the lab. We isolated and purified 50 different bacteria on nutrient agar plates from the soil and plant surfaces. We sequenced the 16S rRNA gene and assigned taxonomy using and NCBI BLAST. We identified several taxa including Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cerus Bacillus megaterium,Patoea angglomerans, Anthrobacter chlophenolicus, Sporosarcina soli, andPseudomonas sp. Single culture growth curves at room temperature in nutrient broth suggest different growth rates for different species; our results show that Serratia marcescens grows the fastest out of the 5 isolates tested. Further, Serratia marcescens appears to outcompete the other isolates when directly grown together. We hope to continue our studies in effort to better understand the bacterial interactions within the soil community.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Characterization of Bacteria from the MSMU Garden

HUB 302-190

Bacteria play important roles in soil ecosystems including the recycling and remineralization of nutrients as well as symbiotic associations with other microbes and plants. The soil microbial community is highly diverse with thousands of species in a single teaspoon of soil. We characterized a portion of the bacterial community in Mount Saint Mary’s University’s garden in an effort to document diversity and explore individual isolate’s physiology and interactions in the lab. We isolated and purified 50 different bacteria on nutrient agar plates from the soil and plant surfaces. We sequenced the 16S rRNA gene and assigned taxonomy using and NCBI BLAST. We identified several taxa including Serratia marcescens, Bacillus cerus Bacillus megaterium,Patoea angglomerans, Anthrobacter chlophenolicus, Sporosarcina soli, andPseudomonas sp. Single culture growth curves at room temperature in nutrient broth suggest different growth rates for different species; our results show that Serratia marcescens grows the fastest out of the 5 isolates tested. Further, Serratia marcescens appears to outcompete the other isolates when directly grown together. We hope to continue our studies in effort to better understand the bacterial interactions within the soil community.