Presentation Title

Colonization, Evolution, and Conservation of Fish Species in the Dominican Republic

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#186

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The Dominican Republic on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola is a natural jewel and biodiversity hotspot and houses an impressive diversity of freshwater fishes. The goal of this project is to create a reference text for this unique and diverse fish assemblage of the Dominican Republic. In the text, we address the research surrounding the potential method(s) of colonization for West Indian fish groups, including historical, biogeographical record and genetic data that inform how species arrived to the islands. The three main colonization hypotheses discussed are transoceanic dispersal, vicariance, and the GAARlandia land bridge hypothesis. We also discuss evolutionary patterns in an island setting, which are microcosms for evolution as they allow researchers to visualize evolutionary patterns more clearly, including but not limited to speciation and adaptive radiation. Next, we discuss conservations efforts, necessary due to restricted land area, smaller populations of organisms, and lower rates of diversity within existing species, which make island organisms more prone to damage than larger populations of the similar groups in mainland areas. Finally, we provide detailed distribution maps and habitat data for each species found in the Dominican Republic. This book will serve as an important tool for students and researchers as it will serve to update available records from the Atlas of North American Fishes supplement publication from 1983 with a more comprehensive inventory of applicable data.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Colonization, Evolution, and Conservation of Fish Species in the Dominican Republic

HUB 302-#186

The Dominican Republic on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola is a natural jewel and biodiversity hotspot and houses an impressive diversity of freshwater fishes. The goal of this project is to create a reference text for this unique and diverse fish assemblage of the Dominican Republic. In the text, we address the research surrounding the potential method(s) of colonization for West Indian fish groups, including historical, biogeographical record and genetic data that inform how species arrived to the islands. The three main colonization hypotheses discussed are transoceanic dispersal, vicariance, and the GAARlandia land bridge hypothesis. We also discuss evolutionary patterns in an island setting, which are microcosms for evolution as they allow researchers to visualize evolutionary patterns more clearly, including but not limited to speciation and adaptive radiation. Next, we discuss conservations efforts, necessary due to restricted land area, smaller populations of organisms, and lower rates of diversity within existing species, which make island organisms more prone to damage than larger populations of the similar groups in mainland areas. Finally, we provide detailed distribution maps and habitat data for each species found in the Dominican Republic. This book will serve as an important tool for students and researchers as it will serve to update available records from the Atlas of North American Fishes supplement publication from 1983 with a more comprehensive inventory of applicable data.