Presentation Title

Design and Fabrication of a Storage Container for Stowed Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#29

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

As demand for military and commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) continues to increase, storage containers designed for the protection of UAVs are becoming essential. The advent of UAVs for commercial use, such as photography, is apparent, and the use of UAVs in military operations is strategically important. In military, UAVs are used for the retrieval of enemy target locations, establishing military strategies, and transporting essential supplies. Hand launched UAVs with stowed wings are used in military operations for their portability. Stowed wings allow the UAV to be placed into a storage container for protection and ease of transportation. We targeted to design and fabricate a container that protects UAVs by minimizing the transfer in magnitudes of the applied forces without compromising structural integrity. We used materials and corresponding sizing that yielded a desired minimal energy transfer ratio. The system was modeled using MATLAB’s Simulink software for preliminary computational data. The vibrations model on Simulink provided design trade-offs between materials and sizing. Upon deciding on an efficient and cost-effective design, we fabricated a prototype. The storage container was dropped from various heights (at a minimum of 12 inches) with UAVs placed and locked internally. Experimental data was obtained using accelerometer sensors placed inside both the UAV and container. The accelerometer provided the measurement of vibrations endured by both objects. As the heights of the drops were increased, the magnitude of the vibrations increased linearly. Material selection consisting of predominantly high density foams proved to yield the lowest energy transfer ratio from the launch tube to the aircraft. Accelerometer data served as validation of our design, leading to manufacturing an optimized UAV storage container that reduced the impact force applied to UAVs.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Design and Fabrication of a Storage Container for Stowed Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

HUB 302-#29

As demand for military and commercial use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) continues to increase, storage containers designed for the protection of UAVs are becoming essential. The advent of UAVs for commercial use, such as photography, is apparent, and the use of UAVs in military operations is strategically important. In military, UAVs are used for the retrieval of enemy target locations, establishing military strategies, and transporting essential supplies. Hand launched UAVs with stowed wings are used in military operations for their portability. Stowed wings allow the UAV to be placed into a storage container for protection and ease of transportation. We targeted to design and fabricate a container that protects UAVs by minimizing the transfer in magnitudes of the applied forces without compromising structural integrity. We used materials and corresponding sizing that yielded a desired minimal energy transfer ratio. The system was modeled using MATLAB’s Simulink software for preliminary computational data. The vibrations model on Simulink provided design trade-offs between materials and sizing. Upon deciding on an efficient and cost-effective design, we fabricated a prototype. The storage container was dropped from various heights (at a minimum of 12 inches) with UAVs placed and locked internally. Experimental data was obtained using accelerometer sensors placed inside both the UAV and container. The accelerometer provided the measurement of vibrations endured by both objects. As the heights of the drops were increased, the magnitude of the vibrations increased linearly. Material selection consisting of predominantly high density foams proved to yield the lowest energy transfer ratio from the launch tube to the aircraft. Accelerometer data served as validation of our design, leading to manufacturing an optimized UAV storage container that reduced the impact force applied to UAVs.