Presentation Title

Controlled Synthesis of Tellurium Nanostructures on Nickel Substrates by Galvanic Displacement Reaction

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#139

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The fast-paced industry of electronic devices and electric vehicles has called for the improvement of rechargeable batteries, especially Lithium-ion batteries. The conventional Lithium-ion batteries demand an enhancement of the cathode in order to elevate its limitation of energy density. Among the elements of the chalcogen group which have been studied as prospective cathode materials for decades, Tellurium is an outstanding material due to its highest electrical conductivity, volumetric capacity, and stable energy density with high Coulombic efficiency. Galvanic displacement reaction (GDR) is employed to chemically plate one-dimensional Tellurium nanostructures on Nickel foam and foil substrates due to its cost effectiveness, easy adjustment, and moderate operating conditions. Optimization of the nanostructure is controlled by the concentrations of Sulfuric acid and Tellurium dioxide as well as time. Tellurium nanowires and nanotubes which provide the most surface area for charging/ discharging processes, are obtained at diverse concentrations of Sulfuric acid and Tellurium dioxide. Tellurium nanostructures are characterized by Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Maximal outer diameters of nanotubes obtained on Nickel foam and Nickel foil are 2.54 micrometers and 6.21 micrometers respectively. Optimizing surface area goes further than just the nanostructure; the use of the Nickel foam provides a porous material that provides not only more surface area for the nanostructures, but also stability during the charge/ discharge operations of the battery. The galvanically displaced Tellurium nanostructures will be tested as cathodes of Lithium-ion batteries for future experiments.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Controlled Synthesis of Tellurium Nanostructures on Nickel Substrates by Galvanic Displacement Reaction

HUB 302-#139

The fast-paced industry of electronic devices and electric vehicles has called for the improvement of rechargeable batteries, especially Lithium-ion batteries. The conventional Lithium-ion batteries demand an enhancement of the cathode in order to elevate its limitation of energy density. Among the elements of the chalcogen group which have been studied as prospective cathode materials for decades, Tellurium is an outstanding material due to its highest electrical conductivity, volumetric capacity, and stable energy density with high Coulombic efficiency. Galvanic displacement reaction (GDR) is employed to chemically plate one-dimensional Tellurium nanostructures on Nickel foam and foil substrates due to its cost effectiveness, easy adjustment, and moderate operating conditions. Optimization of the nanostructure is controlled by the concentrations of Sulfuric acid and Tellurium dioxide as well as time. Tellurium nanowires and nanotubes which provide the most surface area for charging/ discharging processes, are obtained at diverse concentrations of Sulfuric acid and Tellurium dioxide. Tellurium nanostructures are characterized by Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Maximal outer diameters of nanotubes obtained on Nickel foam and Nickel foil are 2.54 micrometers and 6.21 micrometers respectively. Optimizing surface area goes further than just the nanostructure; the use of the Nickel foam provides a porous material that provides not only more surface area for the nanostructures, but also stability during the charge/ discharge operations of the battery. The galvanically displaced Tellurium nanostructures will be tested as cathodes of Lithium-ion batteries for future experiments.