Presentation Title

The Presence of the Golden Ratio in Art

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#150

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The Golden Ratio, a geometric proportion numerically summarized as 1.618, is a ratio in which the proportion of two quantities is equal to the proportion of their sum to the larger of the two parts. It is prevalent in nature (e.g., the pattern of florets in a broccoli crown), architecture (e.g., UN Headquarters in New York City), and art (e.g., color delineation in works by Georges Seurat). It is rumored that the Golden Ratio is widespread throughout the art field because it is aesthetically pleasing. This project discerned whether or not the Golden Ratio is prevalent in the art pieces in Concordia University Irvine’s art collection. To do this, I collected data from twenty-four paintings in Concordia University Irvine’s art collection and found their ratios by dividing the measures of their longer sides by those of their shorter sides. The data collected did not fit the previously established pattern of the Golden Ratio’s prevalence in art, but rather found that 75% of the framed paintings had a ratio of approximately 1.26. We theorized that this new ratio may be even more aesthetically appealing to the human eye than the Golden Ratio and that that can account for its increased prevalence in the art field.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

The Presence of the Golden Ratio in Art

HUB 302-#150

The Golden Ratio, a geometric proportion numerically summarized as 1.618, is a ratio in which the proportion of two quantities is equal to the proportion of their sum to the larger of the two parts. It is prevalent in nature (e.g., the pattern of florets in a broccoli crown), architecture (e.g., UN Headquarters in New York City), and art (e.g., color delineation in works by Georges Seurat). It is rumored that the Golden Ratio is widespread throughout the art field because it is aesthetically pleasing. This project discerned whether or not the Golden Ratio is prevalent in the art pieces in Concordia University Irvine’s art collection. To do this, I collected data from twenty-four paintings in Concordia University Irvine’s art collection and found their ratios by dividing the measures of their longer sides by those of their shorter sides. The data collected did not fit the previously established pattern of the Golden Ratio’s prevalence in art, but rather found that 75% of the framed paintings had a ratio of approximately 1.26. We theorized that this new ratio may be even more aesthetically appealing to the human eye than the Golden Ratio and that that can account for its increased prevalence in the art field.