Presentation Title

How does physical activity prior to breast cancer diagnosis effect rehabilitation outcomes?

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-172

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

To examine the effects of physical activity level prior to cancer diagnosis on post-treatment outcomes following a 24 session, hospital-based cancer rehabilitation program. This was a retrospective chart analysis of female breast cancer (BC) patients (n = 200, aged; 52.7 + 10. 9 y, post-treatment) identified from a large cohort enrolled in the Novant Health Strides to Strength program. Outcome measures included quality of life (FACT-G), body size and composition, aerobic fitness (6 minute walk test [6MWT]), muscular endurance, flexibility and were analyzed across quartiles of physical activity frequency (none, 1-2, 3-5, and 5+ times per week). Complete data was available for 171 women. Prior to rehabilitation, the least active group was significantly heavier and had a higher BMI. Post-treatment, all groups increased their aerobic fitness, quality of life, decreased systolic blood pressure to a minor degree and body weight was unchanged. On average, the most active group increased 6MWT by >100 m representing a two-fold increase over the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). The most active group had significantly greater delta scores in aerobic fitness than the other groups (16.5 vs cumulative 10.4%, p = 0.024). High aerobic fitness is related to increased survival in cancer patients. Interestingly, the most active group had the lowest quality of life scores. This study may assist clinicians designing future cancer rehabilitation programs and indicates that a high physical activity level prior to cancer diagnosis resulted in greater aerobic fitness delta scores.

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How does physical activity prior to breast cancer diagnosis effect rehabilitation outcomes?

HUB 302-172

To examine the effects of physical activity level prior to cancer diagnosis on post-treatment outcomes following a 24 session, hospital-based cancer rehabilitation program. This was a retrospective chart analysis of female breast cancer (BC) patients (n = 200, aged; 52.7 + 10. 9 y, post-treatment) identified from a large cohort enrolled in the Novant Health Strides to Strength program. Outcome measures included quality of life (FACT-G), body size and composition, aerobic fitness (6 minute walk test [6MWT]), muscular endurance, flexibility and were analyzed across quartiles of physical activity frequency (none, 1-2, 3-5, and 5+ times per week). Complete data was available for 171 women. Prior to rehabilitation, the least active group was significantly heavier and had a higher BMI. Post-treatment, all groups increased their aerobic fitness, quality of life, decreased systolic blood pressure to a minor degree and body weight was unchanged. On average, the most active group increased 6MWT by >100 m representing a two-fold increase over the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). The most active group had significantly greater delta scores in aerobic fitness than the other groups (16.5 vs cumulative 10.4%, p = 0.024). High aerobic fitness is related to increased survival in cancer patients. Interestingly, the most active group had the lowest quality of life scores. This study may assist clinicians designing future cancer rehabilitation programs and indicates that a high physical activity level prior to cancer diagnosis resulted in greater aerobic fitness delta scores.