Presentation Title

What are the Predictors of Academic Success in First Generation University Students?

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#138

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Over the past decade, research has attempted to identify correlates of academic success in college students. The data further reveal that first generation students who work part-time and participate in fewer social activities on campus would be less likely to perform well academically compared to their peers who are non-first generation students. This ongoing study attempts to expand upon previous research in this area by examining self-esteem, achievement motives, and adaptation to college as predictors of academic success in a sample of 92 university students. Data are currently available on 52 first generation and 40 non-first generation students. Participants’ self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and achievement motives were assessed using the Work and Family Orientation Questionnaire. In addition, adjustment to college was tested using the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire, whereas academic success was assessed using GPA. In a series of multiple regression analyses, academic success was regressed on the 8 predictors (self-esteem, work motives, mastery motives, competitive motives, academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, and attachment), using a simultaneous procedure. For first generation students, the regression was significant, F(8, 43)=2.47, p=.027, R2 = 0.31. Among the predictors, work motives (B=.33; t=2.03, p=.049) and personal-emotional adjustment (B=.44, t=2.47, p=.017) were significant determinants of academic success. However, for non-first generation students, the regression yielded a trend-level significance, F(8, 31)=2.09, p=.067, R2 = 0.35. Among the predictors, mastery motives (B=.35, t=2.04, p=.05) and social adjustment (B=.45, t=2.16, p= .043) were significant determinants of academic success. Overall, findings from this study may potentially expand our understanding of the role of self-esteem, achievement motives, and adaptation processes on academic success among university students from different generations.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

What are the Predictors of Academic Success in First Generation University Students?

HUB 302-#138

Over the past decade, research has attempted to identify correlates of academic success in college students. The data further reveal that first generation students who work part-time and participate in fewer social activities on campus would be less likely to perform well academically compared to their peers who are non-first generation students. This ongoing study attempts to expand upon previous research in this area by examining self-esteem, achievement motives, and adaptation to college as predictors of academic success in a sample of 92 university students. Data are currently available on 52 first generation and 40 non-first generation students. Participants’ self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and achievement motives were assessed using the Work and Family Orientation Questionnaire. In addition, adjustment to college was tested using the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire, whereas academic success was assessed using GPA. In a series of multiple regression analyses, academic success was regressed on the 8 predictors (self-esteem, work motives, mastery motives, competitive motives, academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, and attachment), using a simultaneous procedure. For first generation students, the regression was significant, F(8, 43)=2.47, p=.027, R2 = 0.31. Among the predictors, work motives (B=.33; t=2.03, p=.049) and personal-emotional adjustment (B=.44, t=2.47, p=.017) were significant determinants of academic success. However, for non-first generation students, the regression yielded a trend-level significance, F(8, 31)=2.09, p=.067, R2 = 0.35. Among the predictors, mastery motives (B=.35, t=2.04, p=.05) and social adjustment (B=.45, t=2.16, p= .043) were significant determinants of academic success. Overall, findings from this study may potentially expand our understanding of the role of self-esteem, achievement motives, and adaptation processes on academic success among university students from different generations.