Presentation Title

The Effects of Nanoparticles on Inefficient Anti-cancer Drugs

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#50

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Nanoparticles have many applications in the sciences, from medicine to optics and even to electronics. This research focuses on nanoparticles as an efficient drug delivery system that is becoming more and more popular in a research setting. As a drug delivery system, nanoparticles have the potential to improve the efficacy of drugs. One such group of drugs are those that have not been previously successful in cancer preventative methods. Nanoparticles could possibly bridge the gap of the failed efficiency of certain FDA approved drugs, and enhance the results of cancer prevention. Through the use of cell cycle analysis of A549 cells, the efficiency of certain nanoparticles versus the drug alone was observed. The drugs used in this study included Erlotinib (Erlo) and Quina. In regards to the Quina drug, both coated and uncoated versions of the nanoparticle were studied in order to analyze the difference between them. These drugs were delivered to A549 cells via nanoparticles, as well as the drug itself. The cells were treated with 5 uM of each drug and their respective nanoparticles for 72 hours. After the 72-hour treatment, cell cycle analyses were run. It was seen in the results that the Quina nanoparticles were inflicting cell arrest in the G2/M phase, while the Erlo nanoparticles could be causing apoptosis. This indicates that although the drugs alone do not influence the cancer cell, the introduction of the drug via nanoparticles does in fact improve the efficiency of the drug.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

The Effects of Nanoparticles on Inefficient Anti-cancer Drugs

HUB 302-#50

Nanoparticles have many applications in the sciences, from medicine to optics and even to electronics. This research focuses on nanoparticles as an efficient drug delivery system that is becoming more and more popular in a research setting. As a drug delivery system, nanoparticles have the potential to improve the efficacy of drugs. One such group of drugs are those that have not been previously successful in cancer preventative methods. Nanoparticles could possibly bridge the gap of the failed efficiency of certain FDA approved drugs, and enhance the results of cancer prevention. Through the use of cell cycle analysis of A549 cells, the efficiency of certain nanoparticles versus the drug alone was observed. The drugs used in this study included Erlotinib (Erlo) and Quina. In regards to the Quina drug, both coated and uncoated versions of the nanoparticle were studied in order to analyze the difference between them. These drugs were delivered to A549 cells via nanoparticles, as well as the drug itself. The cells were treated with 5 uM of each drug and their respective nanoparticles for 72 hours. After the 72-hour treatment, cell cycle analyses were run. It was seen in the results that the Quina nanoparticles were inflicting cell arrest in the G2/M phase, while the Erlo nanoparticles could be causing apoptosis. This indicates that although the drugs alone do not influence the cancer cell, the introduction of the drug via nanoparticles does in fact improve the efficiency of the drug.