Presentation Title

Social support and acculturation in pregnant women of Mexican descent

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#109

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Acculturation is a bidirectional cultural adaptation process that is associated with health declines in Mexican Americans. This may be particularly detrimental for pregnant women, as acculturation in the prenatal period is associated with adverse mental health and birth outcomes. However, what social factors contribute to acculturation during pregnancy are not clear. Therefore this study proposes to understand what social factors contribute to acculturation pregnant women of Mexican descent. We analyzed existing data from on ongoing study about stress during pregnancy. Demographic information from pregnant Mexican American (n=91) women average age of 27 was collected from a clinic in North County San Diego. This included age, income, years in the US, education. To assess social positioning, Hollingshead Four Factor Index was calculated based on occupation and education. Women completed surveys that addressed social support via the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (3 subscales: support from significant others, friends, family), stress via the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and acculturation via the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARMSA-II) which measured cultural orientation toward Mexican and Anglo culture independently. Multiple linear regressions found that when all variables were included in the model, social support from friends and age of mothers predicted both Mexican and Anglo orientation. Social support, rather than social position or perceived stress, may support biculturalism as it was independently associated with Mexican and Anglo orientation. More friend support is associated with more or less Anglo orientation. Pregnant Mexican-American women may benefit most from friendships in their community.

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Social support and acculturation in pregnant women of Mexican descent

HUB 302-#109

Acculturation is a bidirectional cultural adaptation process that is associated with health declines in Mexican Americans. This may be particularly detrimental for pregnant women, as acculturation in the prenatal period is associated with adverse mental health and birth outcomes. However, what social factors contribute to acculturation during pregnancy are not clear. Therefore this study proposes to understand what social factors contribute to acculturation pregnant women of Mexican descent. We analyzed existing data from on ongoing study about stress during pregnancy. Demographic information from pregnant Mexican American (n=91) women average age of 27 was collected from a clinic in North County San Diego. This included age, income, years in the US, education. To assess social positioning, Hollingshead Four Factor Index was calculated based on occupation and education. Women completed surveys that addressed social support via the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (3 subscales: support from significant others, friends, family), stress via the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and acculturation via the Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans (ARMSA-II) which measured cultural orientation toward Mexican and Anglo culture independently. Multiple linear regressions found that when all variables were included in the model, social support from friends and age of mothers predicted both Mexican and Anglo orientation. Social support, rather than social position or perceived stress, may support biculturalism as it was independently associated with Mexican and Anglo orientation. More friend support is associated with more or less Anglo orientation. Pregnant Mexican-American women may benefit most from friendships in their community.