Presentation Title

Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Efficiency Using Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Monolayers

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#59

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Conjugated oligo-electrolytes (COE's), with their carbon double-bonded backbone and charged side groups, have been the subject of intense study due to their fascinating electrical and optical properties. Recently, it has been noted that COE's can increase bacterial membrane permeability to electrons. That is, we can transfer current to and from bacterial cells. This is useful when designing microbial fuel cells (MFC's), which use bacteria to generate electricity. This project looks to improve on previous MFC's by utilizing molecules which can bond to an electrode surface, cross into the cell interior, and provide a pathway for cell-generated electrons to escape, thus increasing efficiency. We find that this class of molecules improves fuel cell performance compared to suitable controls. This research presents exciting opportunities for development of long term power supplies and electrical control of bacteria.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Efficiency Using Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Monolayers

HUB 302-#59

Conjugated oligo-electrolytes (COE's), with their carbon double-bonded backbone and charged side groups, have been the subject of intense study due to their fascinating electrical and optical properties. Recently, it has been noted that COE's can increase bacterial membrane permeability to electrons. That is, we can transfer current to and from bacterial cells. This is useful when designing microbial fuel cells (MFC's), which use bacteria to generate electricity. This project looks to improve on previous MFC's by utilizing molecules which can bond to an electrode surface, cross into the cell interior, and provide a pathway for cell-generated electrons to escape, thus increasing efficiency. We find that this class of molecules improves fuel cell performance compared to suitable controls. This research presents exciting opportunities for development of long term power supplies and electrical control of bacteria.