Presentation Title

The Relationship Between Type and Length of Time of Spinal Cord Injury and Coping Behaviors

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#158

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Context: There is a lack of research with patients who have a spinal cord injury (SCI) as a whole, with little determining what factors have an effect on the patient’s mental health or their desire to recover and attend therapy. Objective: To determine if the type of injury (e.g. complete versus incomplete) and length of time with injury are related to coping behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional from archival data; part of a larger study. Setting: Project Walk® activity-based recovery center. Participants: Upon IRB approval, clients with SCI were recruited for participation. Following informed consent, 18 participants (11 male, 7 female; mean age 33.6 years, range 21-54 years; mean length of time since injury 6.3 years, range 2.75-14 years) completed the study. Interventions: Data was collected in paper and online forms, based on participants’ preference. A researcher assisted participants with survey completion as need (e.g. dictated responses). Main Outcome Measures: The type of injury and length of time with injury were all self-reported measures. The 28-item Brief COPE (Carver, 1997) was used to measure 14 coping behaviors and was scored with the traditional method. Results: There were no significant relationships between type of injury and coping behaviors. There were no significant relationships between length of time since injury and coping. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant relationships between coping behaviors and type of injury or coping and length of time with injury. Future research should aim to recruit more participants and may use a different measure of coping.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

The Relationship Between Type and Length of Time of Spinal Cord Injury and Coping Behaviors

HUB 302-#158

Context: There is a lack of research with patients who have a spinal cord injury (SCI) as a whole, with little determining what factors have an effect on the patient’s mental health or their desire to recover and attend therapy. Objective: To determine if the type of injury (e.g. complete versus incomplete) and length of time with injury are related to coping behaviors. Design: Cross-sectional from archival data; part of a larger study. Setting: Project Walk® activity-based recovery center. Participants: Upon IRB approval, clients with SCI were recruited for participation. Following informed consent, 18 participants (11 male, 7 female; mean age 33.6 years, range 21-54 years; mean length of time since injury 6.3 years, range 2.75-14 years) completed the study. Interventions: Data was collected in paper and online forms, based on participants’ preference. A researcher assisted participants with survey completion as need (e.g. dictated responses). Main Outcome Measures: The type of injury and length of time with injury were all self-reported measures. The 28-item Brief COPE (Carver, 1997) was used to measure 14 coping behaviors and was scored with the traditional method. Results: There were no significant relationships between type of injury and coping behaviors. There were no significant relationships between length of time since injury and coping. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant relationships between coping behaviors and type of injury or coping and length of time with injury. Future research should aim to recruit more participants and may use a different measure of coping.