Presentation Title

Impact of a Western Diet on Lipid Signaling Molecules in the Left Ventricle of Obese Mice

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#32

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Obesity is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease – the leading killer worldwide. To combat this problem, we require a better understanding of biochemical processes that affect heart health in obesity. Endocannabinoids are a class of lipid signaling molecules that regulate many processes, including cardiovascular function and energy balance. The DiPatrizio lab found that endocannabinoids are linked to gut-brain signaling that controls food intake; specifically, endocannabinoids increase food intake when levels rise in the small intestine of rats after tasting dietary fats. However, oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endocannabinoid-like lipid-signaling molecule, is linked to the feeling of satiety. This study strives to understand changes in the production of the endocannabinoids, anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), and OEA, in the left ventricle of lean mice maintained on a standard diet and diet-induced obese mice maintained on a western diet. These lipid signaling molecules were extracted from the left ventricle of the heart, and analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results show significant increases in anandamide and 2-AG levels in the left ventricle of fasting western diet mice over seven, thirty, and sixty days. Fasting for 24-hours had no impact on levels of any molecules in mice maintained on standard diet. This research suggests a diet-dependent rise in endocannabinoids in the left ventricle of obese mice. Further exploration is necessary to better understand the biochemical processes involved in endocannabinoid production in the heart and its physiological relevance to cardiovascular disease, ultimately leading to novel therapeutic interventions in individuals susceptible to obesity-related heart disease.

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Impact of a Western Diet on Lipid Signaling Molecules in the Left Ventricle of Obese Mice

HUB 302-#32

Obesity is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease – the leading killer worldwide. To combat this problem, we require a better understanding of biochemical processes that affect heart health in obesity. Endocannabinoids are a class of lipid signaling molecules that regulate many processes, including cardiovascular function and energy balance. The DiPatrizio lab found that endocannabinoids are linked to gut-brain signaling that controls food intake; specifically, endocannabinoids increase food intake when levels rise in the small intestine of rats after tasting dietary fats. However, oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endocannabinoid-like lipid-signaling molecule, is linked to the feeling of satiety. This study strives to understand changes in the production of the endocannabinoids, anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), and OEA, in the left ventricle of lean mice maintained on a standard diet and diet-induced obese mice maintained on a western diet. These lipid signaling molecules were extracted from the left ventricle of the heart, and analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results show significant increases in anandamide and 2-AG levels in the left ventricle of fasting western diet mice over seven, thirty, and sixty days. Fasting for 24-hours had no impact on levels of any molecules in mice maintained on standard diet. This research suggests a diet-dependent rise in endocannabinoids in the left ventricle of obese mice. Further exploration is necessary to better understand the biochemical processes involved in endocannabinoid production in the heart and its physiological relevance to cardiovascular disease, ultimately leading to novel therapeutic interventions in individuals susceptible to obesity-related heart disease.