Presentation Title

Not All Lives Matter

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#118

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

On Sunday September 18, 2016 it was difficult to find any mention of a United States air strike on a Syrian government army base (during a weeklong ceasefire), which had in fact killed more than 60 people the previous day. This is just one example of the scores of atrocities experienced by citizens of third world countries that occur virtually unnoticed by the rest of the world. When it comes to addressing the dour subject of death, members of modern western societies seem to have less regard for the lives of people living in poverty-stricken nations. This project will aim to uncover the history behind the sentiment expressed by first world nations, through highlighting examples in contemporary affairs, and venture an explanation to the premise as to whether or not these practices and policies can be changed. Through the exploration of this project we will find that the platform for leading countries to neglect the lives of those in less prosperous nations stems from the realist theory of international relations. The realist theory asserts the notion that the dominant countries have nothing to gain from developing nations, and therefor have no interest in their affairs.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Not All Lives Matter

HUB 302-#118

On Sunday September 18, 2016 it was difficult to find any mention of a United States air strike on a Syrian government army base (during a weeklong ceasefire), which had in fact killed more than 60 people the previous day. This is just one example of the scores of atrocities experienced by citizens of third world countries that occur virtually unnoticed by the rest of the world. When it comes to addressing the dour subject of death, members of modern western societies seem to have less regard for the lives of people living in poverty-stricken nations. This project will aim to uncover the history behind the sentiment expressed by first world nations, through highlighting examples in contemporary affairs, and venture an explanation to the premise as to whether or not these practices and policies can be changed. Through the exploration of this project we will find that the platform for leading countries to neglect the lives of those in less prosperous nations stems from the realist theory of international relations. The realist theory asserts the notion that the dominant countries have nothing to gain from developing nations, and therefor have no interest in their affairs.