Presentation Title

Building a low-cost Atomic Force Microscope

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#26

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Nanotechnology is the science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers. It involves study and application of extremely small things and can be used across all the other science fields, such as chemistry, biology, physics, materials science, and engineering. One of the most important acronyms in nanotechnology is AFM - Atomic Force Microscopy. This instrument has become the most widely used tool for imaging, measuring and manipulating matter at the nanoscale. AFM, which was first introduced in 1989, makes it possible to observe nanoscale surfaces and structures beyond the resolution of optical microscopy. The AFM consists of an arm with a sharp tip (probe) at its end that is used to scan the specimen surface. When the tip is brought into proximity of a sample surface, forces between the tip and the sample lead to a deflection of the arm. An AFM is capable of seeing objects only a millionth of a millimeter in size – much beyond the scope of an optical microscope. Commercial AFM typically cost $100,000 or more to buy. This research aims to fabricate an affordable Atomic force microscopy at California State University, Fullerton for a budget of less than $5,000. The project team consisting of a team of five undergraduate students is indigenously designing and fabricating the AFM system. The AFM system consists of various subsystems including 1) scanner head - head mechanics, piezo actuators, probe holder, sample holder, force detection optics 2) analog electronics - quadrant detector, laser supply 3) digital electronics, data acquisition, feedback 4) control software and 5) image processing software. The AFM developed in this research will be used to provide exposure of nanoscience and nanotechnology to students at California State University, Fullerton.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Building a low-cost Atomic Force Microscope

HUB 302-#26

Nanotechnology is the science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers. It involves study and application of extremely small things and can be used across all the other science fields, such as chemistry, biology, physics, materials science, and engineering. One of the most important acronyms in nanotechnology is AFM - Atomic Force Microscopy. This instrument has become the most widely used tool for imaging, measuring and manipulating matter at the nanoscale. AFM, which was first introduced in 1989, makes it possible to observe nanoscale surfaces and structures beyond the resolution of optical microscopy. The AFM consists of an arm with a sharp tip (probe) at its end that is used to scan the specimen surface. When the tip is brought into proximity of a sample surface, forces between the tip and the sample lead to a deflection of the arm. An AFM is capable of seeing objects only a millionth of a millimeter in size – much beyond the scope of an optical microscope. Commercial AFM typically cost $100,000 or more to buy. This research aims to fabricate an affordable Atomic force microscopy at California State University, Fullerton for a budget of less than $5,000. The project team consisting of a team of five undergraduate students is indigenously designing and fabricating the AFM system. The AFM system consists of various subsystems including 1) scanner head - head mechanics, piezo actuators, probe holder, sample holder, force detection optics 2) analog electronics - quadrant detector, laser supply 3) digital electronics, data acquisition, feedback 4) control software and 5) image processing software. The AFM developed in this research will be used to provide exposure of nanoscience and nanotechnology to students at California State University, Fullerton.