Presentation Title

BodPod: The benefits of sleep and exercise on percent body fat

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#76

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

In the last twenty years, obesity has risen among American people (Weaver Aaron et al, 2009). A variety of Americans believe that in order to live a healthy lifestyle they should get the suggested eight hours of rest and exercise at least four hours a week. This study utilized the Bod Pod machine to analyze the relationship between the hours of rest, exercise, and our weight. We hypothesized that subjects with more hours of sleep and exercise would be more fit, having a lower percent body fat. We started with twenty-four female participants which ranged in age, body types, amount of sleep per night, and hours of exercise per week. They were surveyed on the amount of hours they slept per night, hours they exercised per week, and their weight before measurements were taken in the Bod Pod. With this information we were able to analyze how the hours of sleep and exercise affected the percent fat mass and percent free fat mass. Neither of the variables had a significant association to weight. Although some of these variables did not associate with weight it might have been due to inconsistencies such as movement and position of an individual.

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BodPod: The benefits of sleep and exercise on percent body fat

HUB 302-#76

In the last twenty years, obesity has risen among American people (Weaver Aaron et al, 2009). A variety of Americans believe that in order to live a healthy lifestyle they should get the suggested eight hours of rest and exercise at least four hours a week. This study utilized the Bod Pod machine to analyze the relationship between the hours of rest, exercise, and our weight. We hypothesized that subjects with more hours of sleep and exercise would be more fit, having a lower percent body fat. We started with twenty-four female participants which ranged in age, body types, amount of sleep per night, and hours of exercise per week. They were surveyed on the amount of hours they slept per night, hours they exercised per week, and their weight before measurements were taken in the Bod Pod. With this information we were able to analyze how the hours of sleep and exercise affected the percent fat mass and percent free fat mass. Neither of the variables had a significant association to weight. Although some of these variables did not associate with weight it might have been due to inconsistencies such as movement and position of an individual.