Presentation Title

SELF-ASSEMBLY OF SPHERICAL VIRAL SHELLS

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#172

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Most spherical viruses protect their genetic material using a shell, called the capsid. The capsids, often made of thousands of copies of one type of protein, form structures with icosahedral symmetry. To understand the symmetry of viral capsids, we model proteins as particles interacting through Lennard-Jones potential. Using Monte Carlo Simulations, we place 12, 32, and 72 particles on the surface of a sphere and obtain the equilibrium structures. We find that the equilibrium shells obtained in the simulations adopt structures with icosahedral symmetry, consistent with the in vivo and in vitro experiments. Viruses in vitro form other symmetrical structures like snub cubes. We will use the model to study other symmetrical structures found in viruses and other biological shells like Clathrin vesicles.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

SELF-ASSEMBLY OF SPHERICAL VIRAL SHELLS

HUB 302-#172

Most spherical viruses protect their genetic material using a shell, called the capsid. The capsids, often made of thousands of copies of one type of protein, form structures with icosahedral symmetry. To understand the symmetry of viral capsids, we model proteins as particles interacting through Lennard-Jones potential. Using Monte Carlo Simulations, we place 12, 32, and 72 particles on the surface of a sphere and obtain the equilibrium structures. We find that the equilibrium shells obtained in the simulations adopt structures with icosahedral symmetry, consistent with the in vivo and in vitro experiments. Viruses in vitro form other symmetrical structures like snub cubes. We will use the model to study other symmetrical structures found in viruses and other biological shells like Clathrin vesicles.