Presentation Title

Scalable Design and Manufacturing of a Closed Cycle Direct Formate Fuel Cell

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#90

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Research into the conversion and storage of energy has become essential to the development of a renewable energy infrastructure. A proof-of-concept device, closed cycle Direct Formate Fuel Cell (DFFC), has been demonstrated as a viable energy storage solution. By pairing the DFFC with a photovoltaic panel, the electrochemical reduction of carbonate into the non-toxic formate fuel can be achieved. Subsequently, oxidation of formate into carbonate and electricity is shown to take place in the cell and thereby creates a closed cycle. Applying the closed cycle concept, the goal of the present research is to produce a stacked DFFC system computationally optimized to overcome the frequent intermittency of renewable sources of energy, as well as to efficiently provide power to meet the demands of a typical household. In order to optimize the system, a mathematical model to predict the power output of the fuel cell under different operating conditions will be developed. The model will specifically focus on optimizing a variety of different parameters, including: the operating temperature of the polymer anion exchange membrane, the cell’s construction and configuration, the reacting surface area of the membrane electrode assembly, the forced convection of fuels and their subsequent concentrations, and the carbon capturing system. In an effort to validate the updated design approach and optimization model, multiple prototype DFFCs will be manufactured and used for experimentation. These prototypes are modularly designed to allow for parallel and series stacking of the cells to increase the voltage and current output. With the experimental results, a closed cycle DFFC will be developed to sustainably supply power for residential or industrial operation, as well as to provide an alternative method of storing, transporting, and converting energy for consumption.

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Scalable Design and Manufacturing of a Closed Cycle Direct Formate Fuel Cell

HUB 302-#90

Research into the conversion and storage of energy has become essential to the development of a renewable energy infrastructure. A proof-of-concept device, closed cycle Direct Formate Fuel Cell (DFFC), has been demonstrated as a viable energy storage solution. By pairing the DFFC with a photovoltaic panel, the electrochemical reduction of carbonate into the non-toxic formate fuel can be achieved. Subsequently, oxidation of formate into carbonate and electricity is shown to take place in the cell and thereby creates a closed cycle. Applying the closed cycle concept, the goal of the present research is to produce a stacked DFFC system computationally optimized to overcome the frequent intermittency of renewable sources of energy, as well as to efficiently provide power to meet the demands of a typical household. In order to optimize the system, a mathematical model to predict the power output of the fuel cell under different operating conditions will be developed. The model will specifically focus on optimizing a variety of different parameters, including: the operating temperature of the polymer anion exchange membrane, the cell’s construction and configuration, the reacting surface area of the membrane electrode assembly, the forced convection of fuels and their subsequent concentrations, and the carbon capturing system. In an effort to validate the updated design approach and optimization model, multiple prototype DFFCs will be manufactured and used for experimentation. These prototypes are modularly designed to allow for parallel and series stacking of the cells to increase the voltage and current output. With the experimental results, a closed cycle DFFC will be developed to sustainably supply power for residential or industrial operation, as well as to provide an alternative method of storing, transporting, and converting energy for consumption.