Presentation Title

Determining Amyloidogenicity of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) Across Mammalian Species

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-158

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

It is estimated that 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, approximately 8.3% of our population with nearly 2 million new cases each year. While the cause of type 2 diabetes remains unknown, it is known that as the disease progresses, patients lose pancreatic β cells (the cells that produce insulin) with up to 45% loss of pancreas mass in severe cases of the disease. It is believed that the protein, IAPP, is one of the agents responsible for this massive death of β cells. For unknown reasons, IAPP accumulates in the pancreas where it aggregates into a variety of toxic forms that are known to kill β cells. It has been known that the IAPP of mice and rats does not aggregate and that these two species do not develop type-II diabetes; however, the IAPP of monkeys, humans, and cats does aggregate and these species do develop type-II diabetes. To determine if a correlation exists between amyloidogenecity of IAPP and the propensity for an individual to develop type-II diabetes, a list of mammals that do and do not develop diabetes has been compiled. By determining the amyloidogenicity of the IAPP sequences of these animals, we expect to find a correlation between the ability to contract diabetes with the propensity of IAPP to aggregate. Results of our screen will be presented, comparing the aggregation potential of many organismal IAPP sequences compared to that of human IAPP.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Determining Amyloidogenicity of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) Across Mammalian Species

HUB 302-158

It is estimated that 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes, approximately 8.3% of our population with nearly 2 million new cases each year. While the cause of type 2 diabetes remains unknown, it is known that as the disease progresses, patients lose pancreatic β cells (the cells that produce insulin) with up to 45% loss of pancreas mass in severe cases of the disease. It is believed that the protein, IAPP, is one of the agents responsible for this massive death of β cells. For unknown reasons, IAPP accumulates in the pancreas where it aggregates into a variety of toxic forms that are known to kill β cells. It has been known that the IAPP of mice and rats does not aggregate and that these two species do not develop type-II diabetes; however, the IAPP of monkeys, humans, and cats does aggregate and these species do develop type-II diabetes. To determine if a correlation exists between amyloidogenecity of IAPP and the propensity for an individual to develop type-II diabetes, a list of mammals that do and do not develop diabetes has been compiled. By determining the amyloidogenicity of the IAPP sequences of these animals, we expect to find a correlation between the ability to contract diabetes with the propensity of IAPP to aggregate. Results of our screen will be presented, comparing the aggregation potential of many organismal IAPP sequences compared to that of human IAPP.