Presentation Title

Competing Serratia marcescens against gram-positive bacteria

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-25

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Bacteria can thrive in almost any environment. In these environments bacteria have their own methods of competing against neighboring bacteria. We study the gram-negative bacteria Serratia marcescens. S. marcescens is known to have its own methods of competition, which include the Type VI Secretion System. The Type VI Secretion System involves the ejection of effector proteins and virulence factors into competing cells, causing their death. This method of competition only works against gram-negative bacteria, and this led us to investigate whether S. marcescens is capable of inhibiting gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacillus subtilis is a gram-positive bacteria found in soil and the digestive tracts of various mammals. Staphylococcus aureus is found in the nose and respiratory tract. Our method of competition involved co-culturing and counting the colonies in order to determine whether inhibition occurred. We saw that in fact S. marcescens did inhibit the growth of B. subtilis within twenty-four hours by approximately a 55-fold change. Our results for the S. marcescens and S. aureus competition showed that within twenty-four hours S. marcescens inhibited the growth of S. aureus by approximately 10-fold. Interestingly, S. aureus improved the growth of S. marcescens. We have come to the conclusion that S. marcescens is in fact capable of inhibiting the growth of gram-positive bacteria. We are currently investigating the mechanism in which S. marcescens inhibits these gram-positive bacteria.

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Competing Serratia marcescens against gram-positive bacteria

HUB 302-25

Bacteria can thrive in almost any environment. In these environments bacteria have their own methods of competing against neighboring bacteria. We study the gram-negative bacteria Serratia marcescens. S. marcescens is known to have its own methods of competition, which include the Type VI Secretion System. The Type VI Secretion System involves the ejection of effector proteins and virulence factors into competing cells, causing their death. This method of competition only works against gram-negative bacteria, and this led us to investigate whether S. marcescens is capable of inhibiting gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Bacillus subtilis is a gram-positive bacteria found in soil and the digestive tracts of various mammals. Staphylococcus aureus is found in the nose and respiratory tract. Our method of competition involved co-culturing and counting the colonies in order to determine whether inhibition occurred. We saw that in fact S. marcescens did inhibit the growth of B. subtilis within twenty-four hours by approximately a 55-fold change. Our results for the S. marcescens and S. aureus competition showed that within twenty-four hours S. marcescens inhibited the growth of S. aureus by approximately 10-fold. Interestingly, S. aureus improved the growth of S. marcescens. We have come to the conclusion that S. marcescens is in fact capable of inhibiting the growth of gram-positive bacteria. We are currently investigating the mechanism in which S. marcescens inhibits these gram-positive bacteria.