Presentation Title

Sociolinguistic attitudes of Anglo-Saxons and first -generation Latinos towards Latinos who speak English with a Spanish accent

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-13

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Due to the large population of immigrants from Spanish-speaking countries in Southern California, it is common to hear people speak English with a Spanish accent. Some studies have shown that there are negative attitudes towards Spanish accents as well as towards people who speak English with a Spanish accent. Most of those studies have focused on the attitudes of Anglo-Saxons. However, we do not know if first generation Latinos also hold these negative attitudes. The present study analyzes and compares the sociolinguistic attitudes of Anglo-Saxon and first-generation Latino speakers towards Latinos who speak English with a Spanish accent. In addition I look at the possible differences in attitudes towards accents from different languages, such as Chinese, French, German, etc. Data was collected through a survey and a brief interview. The subjects were 15 monolingual speakers of English of no Hispanic descent, and 15 first-generation Latinos. The results show that the attitudes were much more negative among first-generation Latinos than among monolingual English speakers.

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Sociolinguistic attitudes of Anglo-Saxons and first -generation Latinos towards Latinos who speak English with a Spanish accent

HUB 302-13

Due to the large population of immigrants from Spanish-speaking countries in Southern California, it is common to hear people speak English with a Spanish accent. Some studies have shown that there are negative attitudes towards Spanish accents as well as towards people who speak English with a Spanish accent. Most of those studies have focused on the attitudes of Anglo-Saxons. However, we do not know if first generation Latinos also hold these negative attitudes. The present study analyzes and compares the sociolinguistic attitudes of Anglo-Saxon and first-generation Latino speakers towards Latinos who speak English with a Spanish accent. In addition I look at the possible differences in attitudes towards accents from different languages, such as Chinese, French, German, etc. Data was collected through a survey and a brief interview. The subjects were 15 monolingual speakers of English of no Hispanic descent, and 15 first-generation Latinos. The results show that the attitudes were much more negative among first-generation Latinos than among monolingual English speakers.