Presentation Title

Evaluating the relationship between settlement and recruitment in the Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida Carpenter 1864, in Newport Bay, CA.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-144

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The U.S West Coast native Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida, is able to form reefs that provide crucial habitat for invertebrate and fish species. In the past century, however, O. lurida suffered drastic population declines prompting restoration efforts. Subsequent studies show an interest in factors that influence population densities and may therefore enhance local population revival. Nine years of O. lurida larval settlement data in Newport Bay, CA depict significant variation across sites with some locations receiving significantly higher inputs of settlers than others. Settlement studies may provide insight to site-specific conditions that influence larval survival into a settling phase, however, these data do no provide enough information to infer the survival of settlers to a later juvenile stage (“recruitment”). To understand whether larval settlement could predict juvenile recruitment at a site, we monitored both settlement and recruitment of O. lurida by placing ceramic tiles (n = 4 per site) at four sites in Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California. Settlement tiles were replaced every two weeks during the reproductive season (May-August) and recruitment tiles were deployed for the whole season. Upon collection, oysters were identified under a dissecting microscope and converted to number of oysters/m2. The relationship between settlement and recruitment was marginally insignificant (Regression, R2 = 0.23, p-value = 0.085), indicating that site-specific sources of mortality may decouple larval delivery and eventual adult population density. In the case of restoration efforts, it is important to identify site conditions that may inhibit post-settlement survival since settlement alone does not effectively ensure adult population success.

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Evaluating the relationship between settlement and recruitment in the Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida Carpenter 1864, in Newport Bay, CA.

HUB 302-144

The U.S West Coast native Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida, is able to form reefs that provide crucial habitat for invertebrate and fish species. In the past century, however, O. lurida suffered drastic population declines prompting restoration efforts. Subsequent studies show an interest in factors that influence population densities and may therefore enhance local population revival. Nine years of O. lurida larval settlement data in Newport Bay, CA depict significant variation across sites with some locations receiving significantly higher inputs of settlers than others. Settlement studies may provide insight to site-specific conditions that influence larval survival into a settling phase, however, these data do no provide enough information to infer the survival of settlers to a later juvenile stage (“recruitment”). To understand whether larval settlement could predict juvenile recruitment at a site, we monitored both settlement and recruitment of O. lurida by placing ceramic tiles (n = 4 per site) at four sites in Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California. Settlement tiles were replaced every two weeks during the reproductive season (May-August) and recruitment tiles were deployed for the whole season. Upon collection, oysters were identified under a dissecting microscope and converted to number of oysters/m2. The relationship between settlement and recruitment was marginally insignificant (Regression, R2 = 0.23, p-value = 0.085), indicating that site-specific sources of mortality may decouple larval delivery and eventual adult population density. In the case of restoration efforts, it is important to identify site conditions that may inhibit post-settlement survival since settlement alone does not effectively ensure adult population success.