Presentation Title

The Effects of High Impact Practices on Epistemological Beliefs and Attitudes Towards Science

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-181

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Students’ ideas and beliefs about science may differ, however, giving students an opportunity to participate in a high impact practice such as HHMI’s two-year experience (YRE) may help change their beliefs. This study focuses on the following questions: 1) Do student’s epistemological beliefs change when participating in HHMI YRE? and 2) Does a student’s attitude toward science change when participating in HHMI YRE? STEM majors took the Scientific Attitude Inventory before and after YRE. The instrument assessed six factors, positively and negatively employing a Likert scale (Moore, 1970). Analyses included nonparametric statistical methods. Preliminary results show a positive shift in the belief that in order to act in a scientific manner one must be able to alter their position on the basis of sufficient evidence. This study contributes to the effort to assess the HIP value of authentic research experiences for undergraduates beyond participant self-reported perceptions.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

The Effects of High Impact Practices on Epistemological Beliefs and Attitudes Towards Science

HUB 302-181

Students’ ideas and beliefs about science may differ, however, giving students an opportunity to participate in a high impact practice such as HHMI’s two-year experience (YRE) may help change their beliefs. This study focuses on the following questions: 1) Do student’s epistemological beliefs change when participating in HHMI YRE? and 2) Does a student’s attitude toward science change when participating in HHMI YRE? STEM majors took the Scientific Attitude Inventory before and after YRE. The instrument assessed six factors, positively and negatively employing a Likert scale (Moore, 1970). Analyses included nonparametric statistical methods. Preliminary results show a positive shift in the belief that in order to act in a scientific manner one must be able to alter their position on the basis of sufficient evidence. This study contributes to the effort to assess the HIP value of authentic research experiences for undergraduates beyond participant self-reported perceptions.