Presentation Title

Lower Limb Walking Exoskeleton

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-63

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Restoration of mobility following injuries like fractures, surgery, stroke, or spinal cord injuries is a major task in neurorehabilitation. The goal of our research is to design and construct a mechanized wearable orthotic device to be deployed in parallel to the human body and to enable the repetitive practice of gait like patterns without needing any external help. The orthotic device is based on a six-bar linkage that has been designed to guide the lower limb joint kinematics to replicate a natural physiological walking gait. The project focus on design and development of a physical prototype of the orthotic. Studies of the movement analysis of healthy subjects with and without the orthotic device using motion capture, force plate and electromyogram (EMG) studies to test the kinematics, ground reaction forces, and muscle activation patterns during walking respectively. Our results so far show that designed wearable walking device mimics the human walking motion. During the conference, our team will present background research and conceptual design.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Lower Limb Walking Exoskeleton

HUB 302-63

Restoration of mobility following injuries like fractures, surgery, stroke, or spinal cord injuries is a major task in neurorehabilitation. The goal of our research is to design and construct a mechanized wearable orthotic device to be deployed in parallel to the human body and to enable the repetitive practice of gait like patterns without needing any external help. The orthotic device is based on a six-bar linkage that has been designed to guide the lower limb joint kinematics to replicate a natural physiological walking gait. The project focus on design and development of a physical prototype of the orthotic. Studies of the movement analysis of healthy subjects with and without the orthotic device using motion capture, force plate and electromyogram (EMG) studies to test the kinematics, ground reaction forces, and muscle activation patterns during walking respectively. Our results so far show that designed wearable walking device mimics the human walking motion. During the conference, our team will present background research and conceptual design.