Presentation Title

Construction of a Hand Operated Centrifuge

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-122

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The primary goal of this project was to construct a hand-operated centrifuge that could work for small and large test tubes (larger than 20 mL) as well as separatory funnels. A major driving force behind this project to construct a hand operated centrifuge that is more cost efficient than conventional, electronically powered centrifuges and is also environmentally friendly. The centrifuge can be accessible and affordable for academics and research facilities with limited access to electricity and monetary funds. The centrifuge constructed was versatile and adaptable, meaning that it can be used not only for small test tubes but also for large test tubes and separatory funnels. Breaking the emulsion caused by immiscible solvents during extractions within the separatory funnel speeds experiments up and saves ionic solids used to aid in separation. The internal mechanism of the constructed centrifuge is a 90o spur gear derived from a metal egg beater which was transformed to build the centrifuge using sheet metal and wood. A number of power tools were used to make the modifications, including a power drill, dremel and a milling machine. All the materials used to bind, bolt, and tighten the centrifuge were purchased from a local hardware store. Two removable platforms were developed so the user could either centrifuge up to four large test tubes or four separatory funnels in two sizes. The centrifuge can easily reach 180 revolutions per minute (rpm). It was designed to provide comfort, stability, and effectiveness. The centrifuge constructed will be used as prototype to develop more cost-effective and reproducible hand-operated centrifuges which will be inexpensive and widely available. Other potential future paths of this project include improvements of design to increase the rpm, decrease waste (wood, sheet metals, electricity), and creating a detailed schematic for reproduction in different settings.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Construction of a Hand Operated Centrifuge

HUB 302-122

The primary goal of this project was to construct a hand-operated centrifuge that could work for small and large test tubes (larger than 20 mL) as well as separatory funnels. A major driving force behind this project to construct a hand operated centrifuge that is more cost efficient than conventional, electronically powered centrifuges and is also environmentally friendly. The centrifuge can be accessible and affordable for academics and research facilities with limited access to electricity and monetary funds. The centrifuge constructed was versatile and adaptable, meaning that it can be used not only for small test tubes but also for large test tubes and separatory funnels. Breaking the emulsion caused by immiscible solvents during extractions within the separatory funnel speeds experiments up and saves ionic solids used to aid in separation. The internal mechanism of the constructed centrifuge is a 90o spur gear derived from a metal egg beater which was transformed to build the centrifuge using sheet metal and wood. A number of power tools were used to make the modifications, including a power drill, dremel and a milling machine. All the materials used to bind, bolt, and tighten the centrifuge were purchased from a local hardware store. Two removable platforms were developed so the user could either centrifuge up to four large test tubes or four separatory funnels in two sizes. The centrifuge can easily reach 180 revolutions per minute (rpm). It was designed to provide comfort, stability, and effectiveness. The centrifuge constructed will be used as prototype to develop more cost-effective and reproducible hand-operated centrifuges which will be inexpensive and widely available. Other potential future paths of this project include improvements of design to increase the rpm, decrease waste (wood, sheet metals, electricity), and creating a detailed schematic for reproduction in different settings.