Presentation Title

An Analysis of the Relationship between Speech and Gesture across Acid-Base Neutralization and Cellular Signal Cascading Contexts

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-182

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

A key factor in chemical literacy is to manifest rich understanding by one’s ability to pose scientific explanations of molecular mechanistic processes that transcend the macroscopic and particulate levels. Study goals were to determine key and frequent gestures that are indicative of mechanistic explanations and to explore their potential relationship in lectures by experienced instructors on acid-base neutralization and cascade signaling in cells. Speech and gestures from the recorded lectures were transcribed and analyzed for the frequency of conceptual reasoning (R-C) that can interpret, visualize, and learn each concept (Schönborn & Anderson, 2009). Preliminary results reveal that the frequency of the conceptual reasoning varied by speech and gesture across the duration of the lesson, the lesson constructs, and by instructor. This project will help develop a better understanding of how gestures may serve as a type of visualization to promote molecular mechanistic explanation in these biochemical/chemical contexts.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

An Analysis of the Relationship between Speech and Gesture across Acid-Base Neutralization and Cellular Signal Cascading Contexts

HUB 302-182

A key factor in chemical literacy is to manifest rich understanding by one’s ability to pose scientific explanations of molecular mechanistic processes that transcend the macroscopic and particulate levels. Study goals were to determine key and frequent gestures that are indicative of mechanistic explanations and to explore their potential relationship in lectures by experienced instructors on acid-base neutralization and cascade signaling in cells. Speech and gestures from the recorded lectures were transcribed and analyzed for the frequency of conceptual reasoning (R-C) that can interpret, visualize, and learn each concept (Schönborn & Anderson, 2009). Preliminary results reveal that the frequency of the conceptual reasoning varied by speech and gesture across the duration of the lesson, the lesson constructs, and by instructor. This project will help develop a better understanding of how gestures may serve as a type of visualization to promote molecular mechanistic explanation in these biochemical/chemical contexts.