Presentation Title

Fabrication of Graphene Desalination Membranes Supported by Nanoporous Anodized Aluminum Oxide

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-154

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Compared to polymer-based desalination membranes, computational studies suggest that perforated graphene sheets enhance the flux of pure solvent while maintaining high solute rejection, promising improved efficiency of water purification systems. The few experimental studies designed to probe the flux enhancement produced conflicting results, rendering graphene’s true effect on desalination inconclusive. In an effort to validate computational predictions, a novel structure was fabricated for the study of pressure-driven and diffusive flow through monolayer graphene. A pristine graphene layer was first grown on high-purity copper foil, followed by a plasma treatment to introduce defects to the layer. The monolayer was then carefully transferred to a nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide scaffolding. The resulting membranes were tested in a microfluidics system, measuring both solvent flux and solute rejection of salt solutions at various concentrations. Results show that graphene growth, transfer and plasma treatment can be done effectively to induce a range of defect intensities. Preliminary microfluidics measurements show crossflow through structure with applied pressures greater than 2500 mbar.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Fabrication of Graphene Desalination Membranes Supported by Nanoporous Anodized Aluminum Oxide

HUB 302-154

Compared to polymer-based desalination membranes, computational studies suggest that perforated graphene sheets enhance the flux of pure solvent while maintaining high solute rejection, promising improved efficiency of water purification systems. The few experimental studies designed to probe the flux enhancement produced conflicting results, rendering graphene’s true effect on desalination inconclusive. In an effort to validate computational predictions, a novel structure was fabricated for the study of pressure-driven and diffusive flow through monolayer graphene. A pristine graphene layer was first grown on high-purity copper foil, followed by a plasma treatment to introduce defects to the layer. The monolayer was then carefully transferred to a nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide scaffolding. The resulting membranes were tested in a microfluidics system, measuring both solvent flux and solute rejection of salt solutions at various concentrations. Results show that graphene growth, transfer and plasma treatment can be done effectively to induce a range of defect intensities. Preliminary microfluidics measurements show crossflow through structure with applied pressures greater than 2500 mbar.