Presentation Title

Life on the High School Totem Pole

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-177

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

This cross-sectional investigation examined adolescents’ social experiences as correlates of their behavioral reputations and depressive symptoms in a sample of 379 (165 girls, 214 boys) ninth-grade students. Self-report instruments were used to assess four dimensions of participants’ social experiences (liking, disliking, popularity, and unpopularity), their behavioral reputations (overt, relational, and electronic victim and electronic aggressor), and depressive symptoms. Bivariate correlations showed that liking and popularity, positive social experiences, were highly correlated. Disliking and unpopularity, negative social experiences, were moderately correlated. Popularity was positively associated with a reputation as both a victim and a perpetrator of electronic aggression and negatively correlated with depressive symptoms. Liking was negatively associated with relational and overt victimization and depressive symptoms. Unpopularity was associated with overt victimization, and depressive symptoms, and negatively associated with electronic aggression. Disliking was associated with overt, relational and electronic victimization and depressive symptoms.

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Life on the High School Totem Pole

HUB 302-177

This cross-sectional investigation examined adolescents’ social experiences as correlates of their behavioral reputations and depressive symptoms in a sample of 379 (165 girls, 214 boys) ninth-grade students. Self-report instruments were used to assess four dimensions of participants’ social experiences (liking, disliking, popularity, and unpopularity), their behavioral reputations (overt, relational, and electronic victim and electronic aggressor), and depressive symptoms. Bivariate correlations showed that liking and popularity, positive social experiences, were highly correlated. Disliking and unpopularity, negative social experiences, were moderately correlated. Popularity was positively associated with a reputation as both a victim and a perpetrator of electronic aggression and negatively correlated with depressive symptoms. Liking was negatively associated with relational and overt victimization and depressive symptoms. Unpopularity was associated with overt victimization, and depressive symptoms, and negatively associated with electronic aggression. Disliking was associated with overt, relational and electronic victimization and depressive symptoms.