Presentation Title

The Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Overweight Obese Males

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-153

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Resting substrate metabolism and the shift in oxidation of carbohydrate to fat may positively influence obesity and/or adipose tissue. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a known super-antioxidant that can be consumed or produced in the body and has the ability to influence adiposity. Whether resting substrate metabolism is impacted by ALA consumption has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to determine if ALA consumption in young overweight or obese males would impact body composition and resting energy metabolism by influencing indirect oxygen consumption (VO2), respiratory quotient (RQ), heart rate (HR), and total estimated energy requirements (EER) as indicators of fat oxidation and eventually fat loss. Nine fasting overweight or obese males (N=9, age 21.4 ± 2.6 years, body mass index 33.9 ± 5.0 kg/m2) were asked to visit the laboratory for resting body composition assessments (Tanita 310, Tanita, Japan), and indirect calorimetry which included: VO2, RQ, HR, and EER. Participants were randomized into two groups, ALA (N=6, age 20.3 ± 2.1 years, 600 mg ALA, General Nutrition Company) and placebo (PLAC, N=3, age 23.7 ± 2.1 years, 600 mg cellulose fiber, Vital Nutrients) for an 8-week double blind placebo controlled intervention. A Mann Whitney U Test (SPSS v.24, P-value of < 0.05 for significance) was used to assess the differences between the indirect calorimetry variables collected at pre and post (delta scores) for both the ALA and PLAC groups. No significant differences were found for body composition, VO2, RQ, HR, and EER. Therefore, no benefit was seen for adiposity or resting energy metabolism following the consumption of 8 weeks of ALA in overweight or obese males. Future studies assessing ALA consumption with the addition of physical activity on resting or during exercise energy metabolism in overweight or obese males are needed.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

The Effects of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Overweight Obese Males

HUB 302-153

Resting substrate metabolism and the shift in oxidation of carbohydrate to fat may positively influence obesity and/or adipose tissue. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a known super-antioxidant that can be consumed or produced in the body and has the ability to influence adiposity. Whether resting substrate metabolism is impacted by ALA consumption has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to determine if ALA consumption in young overweight or obese males would impact body composition and resting energy metabolism by influencing indirect oxygen consumption (VO2), respiratory quotient (RQ), heart rate (HR), and total estimated energy requirements (EER) as indicators of fat oxidation and eventually fat loss. Nine fasting overweight or obese males (N=9, age 21.4 ± 2.6 years, body mass index 33.9 ± 5.0 kg/m2) were asked to visit the laboratory for resting body composition assessments (Tanita 310, Tanita, Japan), and indirect calorimetry which included: VO2, RQ, HR, and EER. Participants were randomized into two groups, ALA (N=6, age 20.3 ± 2.1 years, 600 mg ALA, General Nutrition Company) and placebo (PLAC, N=3, age 23.7 ± 2.1 years, 600 mg cellulose fiber, Vital Nutrients) for an 8-week double blind placebo controlled intervention. A Mann Whitney U Test (SPSS v.24, P-value of < 0.05 for significance) was used to assess the differences between the indirect calorimetry variables collected at pre and post (delta scores) for both the ALA and PLAC groups. No significant differences were found for body composition, VO2, RQ, HR, and EER. Therefore, no benefit was seen for adiposity or resting energy metabolism following the consumption of 8 weeks of ALA in overweight or obese males. Future studies assessing ALA consumption with the addition of physical activity on resting or during exercise energy metabolism in overweight or obese males are needed.