Presentation Title

Bioconversion of agricultural wastes from the livestock industry for biofuel and feed production.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-3

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The large-scale livestock and dairy industries in California are adversely affected by the high cost of feed and the current regulatory pressure to recover nutrients derived from manure waste. Microalgae are a candidate group that are extremely efficient in nutrient uptake and have favorable protein and lipid qualities for feed supplements. Axenic isolates were identified using ITS sequence comparisons studied under controlled laboratory conditions that simulate key factors in seasonal pond operation at the SLO dairy. The goal is to optimize production of strains that can compete in outdoor ponds and also have a proximal biochemical composition to serve as a high protein, high lipid feed supplement. Carbon and nitrogen preferences were analysed in high throughput experiments to optimize growth, protein and lipid content by manipulating culture conditions. Animal feed production is a relatively low-value commodity, even when coupled to bioremediation as a co-product. Hence the optimization of growth of favourable strains in outdoor ponds is crucial.

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Bioconversion of agricultural wastes from the livestock industry for biofuel and feed production.

HUB 302-3

The large-scale livestock and dairy industries in California are adversely affected by the high cost of feed and the current regulatory pressure to recover nutrients derived from manure waste. Microalgae are a candidate group that are extremely efficient in nutrient uptake and have favorable protein and lipid qualities for feed supplements. Axenic isolates were identified using ITS sequence comparisons studied under controlled laboratory conditions that simulate key factors in seasonal pond operation at the SLO dairy. The goal is to optimize production of strains that can compete in outdoor ponds and also have a proximal biochemical composition to serve as a high protein, high lipid feed supplement. Carbon and nitrogen preferences were analysed in high throughput experiments to optimize growth, protein and lipid content by manipulating culture conditions. Animal feed production is a relatively low-value commodity, even when coupled to bioremediation as a co-product. Hence the optimization of growth of favourable strains in outdoor ponds is crucial.