Presentation Title

Influence of Learning and Cognitive aptitude on Reading Comprehension

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-89

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Reading comprehension is essentially a product of the reader’s mental representation of textual information (Kintsch, 1988; Kintsch, 2012). Applying meaning to written language requires a number of complex cognitive processes. Readers must decode lexical items, and must understand underlying syntactical structures, while simultaneously conceptualizing mental representations of information. Reading comprehension is therefore a dynamic process for every individual. Current theories support the idea that reading comprehension is related to cognitive skills, but less is known about its relationship to different learning aptitudes. This study examines the possibility that reading comprehension abilities might be correlated with different learning aptitudes. To test this hypothesis, we used the Inventory of Learning Style (ILS) Test to characterize readers as Holistic or Analytic learners, and we tested their reading abilities through a novel academic reading comprehension task (select questions from the 2016 PSAT) as well as a battery of baseline cognitive tasks (including verbal working memory –Operational Span task-). We hypothesize that different learning aptitudes, i.e., Holistic and Analytic, may predict different reading comprehension performance. Currently, we tested 12 native English monolingual participants. Preliminary results point towards a correlation between learning aptitudes and text reading abilities, suggesting that differences in learning styles impact high levels of reading comprehension.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Influence of Learning and Cognitive aptitude on Reading Comprehension

HUB 302-89

Reading comprehension is essentially a product of the reader’s mental representation of textual information (Kintsch, 1988; Kintsch, 2012). Applying meaning to written language requires a number of complex cognitive processes. Readers must decode lexical items, and must understand underlying syntactical structures, while simultaneously conceptualizing mental representations of information. Reading comprehension is therefore a dynamic process for every individual. Current theories support the idea that reading comprehension is related to cognitive skills, but less is known about its relationship to different learning aptitudes. This study examines the possibility that reading comprehension abilities might be correlated with different learning aptitudes. To test this hypothesis, we used the Inventory of Learning Style (ILS) Test to characterize readers as Holistic or Analytic learners, and we tested their reading abilities through a novel academic reading comprehension task (select questions from the 2016 PSAT) as well as a battery of baseline cognitive tasks (including verbal working memory –Operational Span task-). We hypothesize that different learning aptitudes, i.e., Holistic and Analytic, may predict different reading comprehension performance. Currently, we tested 12 native English monolingual participants. Preliminary results point towards a correlation between learning aptitudes and text reading abilities, suggesting that differences in learning styles impact high levels of reading comprehension.