Presentation Title

Transmission-line Pulse Testing and Oscilloscope Error

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-108

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Electrostatic discharge events are one of the leading causes of integrated circuit failure. Integrated circuits must be enhanced with electrostatic discharge protection capabilities in order to ensure proper operation in real world applications. Various techniques have been introduced to study a circuit’s response to electrostatic discharge events such as transmission-line pulse. This research focuses on the electrostatic discharge device characterization using transmission-line pulse testing to predict and verify device reliability. Prior to conducting transmission-line pulse testing, we first measured the error introduced by our oscilloscope for both positive and negative voltages using a positive metal-oxide semiconductor (PMOS) switch circuit and a relay circuit. These error measurements were later used to correct our measurements during device testing.

The procedure for transmission-line pulse testing involves discharging a high voltage pulse onto the device under test for about 200 ns. Setting up the experiment involved using a probe apparatus to probe the appropriate pins on a given integrated circuit. Once the appropriate pins were probed, we would set up the testing parameters on the graphical user interface. These testing parameters included the high voltage pulse limit, pulse duration, and DC leakage current limits. After everything was properly initialized, we would switch on the machine to begin testing. During testing an oscilloscope is used to obtain current and voltage measurements to create an I-V plot. After each pulse, DC leakage current is measured to detect damage to the device under test. The amplitude of the high voltage pulse is increased each time until the DC leakage current reaches a predefined threshold as to not cause permanent damage to the integrated circuit. Test duration ranged from twenty minutes to an hour. Some of the integrated circuits we tested included LED drivers that were designed at the research institute by other engineers. Most of the integrated circuits we tested produced positive results, but some devices failed our test and had to be sent back to the designers.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Transmission-line Pulse Testing and Oscilloscope Error

HUB 302-108

Electrostatic discharge events are one of the leading causes of integrated circuit failure. Integrated circuits must be enhanced with electrostatic discharge protection capabilities in order to ensure proper operation in real world applications. Various techniques have been introduced to study a circuit’s response to electrostatic discharge events such as transmission-line pulse. This research focuses on the electrostatic discharge device characterization using transmission-line pulse testing to predict and verify device reliability. Prior to conducting transmission-line pulse testing, we first measured the error introduced by our oscilloscope for both positive and negative voltages using a positive metal-oxide semiconductor (PMOS) switch circuit and a relay circuit. These error measurements were later used to correct our measurements during device testing.

The procedure for transmission-line pulse testing involves discharging a high voltage pulse onto the device under test for about 200 ns. Setting up the experiment involved using a probe apparatus to probe the appropriate pins on a given integrated circuit. Once the appropriate pins were probed, we would set up the testing parameters on the graphical user interface. These testing parameters included the high voltage pulse limit, pulse duration, and DC leakage current limits. After everything was properly initialized, we would switch on the machine to begin testing. During testing an oscilloscope is used to obtain current and voltage measurements to create an I-V plot. After each pulse, DC leakage current is measured to detect damage to the device under test. The amplitude of the high voltage pulse is increased each time until the DC leakage current reaches a predefined threshold as to not cause permanent damage to the integrated circuit. Test duration ranged from twenty minutes to an hour. Some of the integrated circuits we tested included LED drivers that were designed at the research institute by other engineers. Most of the integrated circuits we tested produced positive results, but some devices failed our test and had to be sent back to the designers.