Presentation Title

Disney Matterhorn Wear Inspection

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#130

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The Matterhorn attraction at the Disneyland Resort is the world’s first tubular steel roller coaster. Disney’s goal is to ensure a safe and enjoyable attraction for guests’ of all ages and in order to do this they have a dedicated maintenance group who perform large amounts maintenance and detailed inspections. Several of the performed inspections are tedious in nature and could be made more efficient by leveraging emerging technologies. When inspecting the bottom of the track rails for wear by the braking system, the Cast Members use a manual tool with a screw and caliper to measure the depth of wear. Our team is going to work on the design for an updated tool/mechanism that can increase the efficiency of their inspections.

Initial design concepts are to use a splash-resistant camera system to record images of the track as well as an electronic scanner to measure depth of located areas of wear. Ideally, our design will stay fixed at specific points on the track where braking (and therefore wear) is a common occurrence. Our design will require a software engineer to develop a computer program that leverages recorded camera and scanner data and stores it in a user friendly interface. It is also crucial to have a backup plan in case the original design does not function adequately at all times. Initial concepts for this device will be human operated like their current inspection device but will use a spring dial, which will allow for more accurate readings. It will need to be small and lightweight to allow for easy use anywhere in the attraction. At the conference the team will present our literature survey along with our concept designs.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Disney Matterhorn Wear Inspection

HUB 302-#130

The Matterhorn attraction at the Disneyland Resort is the world’s first tubular steel roller coaster. Disney’s goal is to ensure a safe and enjoyable attraction for guests’ of all ages and in order to do this they have a dedicated maintenance group who perform large amounts maintenance and detailed inspections. Several of the performed inspections are tedious in nature and could be made more efficient by leveraging emerging technologies. When inspecting the bottom of the track rails for wear by the braking system, the Cast Members use a manual tool with a screw and caliper to measure the depth of wear. Our team is going to work on the design for an updated tool/mechanism that can increase the efficiency of their inspections.

Initial design concepts are to use a splash-resistant camera system to record images of the track as well as an electronic scanner to measure depth of located areas of wear. Ideally, our design will stay fixed at specific points on the track where braking (and therefore wear) is a common occurrence. Our design will require a software engineer to develop a computer program that leverages recorded camera and scanner data and stores it in a user friendly interface. It is also crucial to have a backup plan in case the original design does not function adequately at all times. Initial concepts for this device will be human operated like their current inspection device but will use a spring dial, which will allow for more accurate readings. It will need to be small and lightweight to allow for easy use anywhere in the attraction. At the conference the team will present our literature survey along with our concept designs.