Presentation Title

The elasticity of the mindless social response towards computers.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-173

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

A key finding in psychology has been that humans treat all media, including technology, as they treat other humans. This humanization of technology is implicit and subconscious, yet nonetheless as robust and nuanced as human to human interaction. While a large body of research has examined the extent of overlap between human-human interaction and human-computer interaction, little is known about the psychology of human-computer interaction. One crucial question remains: is the mindless social response elastic? In other words, can humans treat certain agentic technologies more like humans than other agentic technologies? This poster reviews the existing literature to address these questions and propose two experiments. Experiment 1 is designed to determine if the mindless social response is elastic and given it is, experiment 2 proceeds to isolate potential design features that determine this elasticity. The results of our exhaustive literature review suggest that the mindless social response is elastic, but has an upper-bound determined by and varying with individual variation. Our literature search confirms our hypothesis that the mindless social response can be modulated by specific design features, with anthropomorphizing characters eliciting the greatest implicit humanization of computers. Our research is particularly important to the design of autonomous agents such as self-driving cars, which require the creation and maintenance of a specific affective relationship for robust and safe use. We conclude by discussing how our literature-analysis results can be solidified with data from our proposed experiments

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

The elasticity of the mindless social response towards computers.

HUB 302-173

A key finding in psychology has been that humans treat all media, including technology, as they treat other humans. This humanization of technology is implicit and subconscious, yet nonetheless as robust and nuanced as human to human interaction. While a large body of research has examined the extent of overlap between human-human interaction and human-computer interaction, little is known about the psychology of human-computer interaction. One crucial question remains: is the mindless social response elastic? In other words, can humans treat certain agentic technologies more like humans than other agentic technologies? This poster reviews the existing literature to address these questions and propose two experiments. Experiment 1 is designed to determine if the mindless social response is elastic and given it is, experiment 2 proceeds to isolate potential design features that determine this elasticity. The results of our exhaustive literature review suggest that the mindless social response is elastic, but has an upper-bound determined by and varying with individual variation. Our literature search confirms our hypothesis that the mindless social response can be modulated by specific design features, with anthropomorphizing characters eliciting the greatest implicit humanization of computers. Our research is particularly important to the design of autonomous agents such as self-driving cars, which require the creation and maintenance of a specific affective relationship for robust and safe use. We conclude by discussing how our literature-analysis results can be solidified with data from our proposed experiments