Presentation Title

Response of mangrove species to salinity changes in the Mai Po Nature Reserve

Presenter Information

Juan Navarro, Whittier CollegeFollow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#35

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Mangroves are under threat due to effluent pollution, habitat loss, and land conversion that their coastal habitats undergo. These unique plant species serve a key role as primary producers by providing for the abundance of wildlife within the ecosystem. Elimination of mangrove forest can potentially alter trophic interactions. We investigated the response of mangrove species to salinity changes in the Mai Po Nature Reserve, which is a designated Ramsar site. The reserve was originally a collection of tidal shrimp ponds, known as gei wai, used for aquaculture practices. The reserve is now mainly managed for roosting and migratory birds of which thirteen species are globally threatened. Mai Po contains a few freshwater ponds, many brackish water gei wai and an intertidal zone which connects to the eastern shore of Deep Bay. We measured stomatal conductance and water potential of three mangrove species, Aegicirus corniculatum, Kandelia obovata and Acanthus illicifolius (Spiny Bear’s Breech) in freshwater ponds, gei wai and the intertidal zone. In each of these locations we sampled a total of three individuals of each species except where a species was absent. We hypothesized that the three species would have higher stomatal conductance and water potential in the Intertidal zone, and lower stomatal conductance and water potential in the freshwater ponds. Mean stomatal conductance for Kandelia and Aegicirus was highest in the gei wai, and pre-dawn water potentials for Kandelia and Aegicirus were lowest in the freshwater ponds. Spiny Bear’s Breech exhibited lowest mid-day water potential in the freshwater pond. The results disprove our hypothesis that the intertidal zone would have higher stomatal conductance and water potential. Low stomatal conductance and water potentials within the freshwater ponds indicate that freshwater conditions are unfavorable for these mangrove species.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Response of mangrove species to salinity changes in the Mai Po Nature Reserve

HUB 302-#35

Mangroves are under threat due to effluent pollution, habitat loss, and land conversion that their coastal habitats undergo. These unique plant species serve a key role as primary producers by providing for the abundance of wildlife within the ecosystem. Elimination of mangrove forest can potentially alter trophic interactions. We investigated the response of mangrove species to salinity changes in the Mai Po Nature Reserve, which is a designated Ramsar site. The reserve was originally a collection of tidal shrimp ponds, known as gei wai, used for aquaculture practices. The reserve is now mainly managed for roosting and migratory birds of which thirteen species are globally threatened. Mai Po contains a few freshwater ponds, many brackish water gei wai and an intertidal zone which connects to the eastern shore of Deep Bay. We measured stomatal conductance and water potential of three mangrove species, Aegicirus corniculatum, Kandelia obovata and Acanthus illicifolius (Spiny Bear’s Breech) in freshwater ponds, gei wai and the intertidal zone. In each of these locations we sampled a total of three individuals of each species except where a species was absent. We hypothesized that the three species would have higher stomatal conductance and water potential in the Intertidal zone, and lower stomatal conductance and water potential in the freshwater ponds. Mean stomatal conductance for Kandelia and Aegicirus was highest in the gei wai, and pre-dawn water potentials for Kandelia and Aegicirus were lowest in the freshwater ponds. Spiny Bear’s Breech exhibited lowest mid-day water potential in the freshwater pond. The results disprove our hypothesis that the intertidal zone would have higher stomatal conductance and water potential. Low stomatal conductance and water potentials within the freshwater ponds indicate that freshwater conditions are unfavorable for these mangrove species.