Presentation Title

Stainless Steel Modification Using Cold Plasma Treatment

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-176

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Past studies have demonstrated that increasing the surface energy of metal materials improves their resistance to surface biofilm growth. We investigate surface energy modification with radio frequency-generated cold atmospheric pressure plasma composed of helium and oxygen on various metal surfaces as a means of reducing biofilm growth on metal implants within the body. We treated stainless steel using a commercial Surfx shower head type plasma reactor to determine the dependence of surface energy on the direction of plasma flow (parallel versus orthogonal to the surface) and on exposure time. Water droplet contact angle was used as a measure of surface energy and plasma molecular spectra were measured with a spectrometer throughout treatment to monitor the concentrations of reactive oxygen species which are known to prevent bacterial growth. Once the treatment times required to reach maximum surface energy levels were determined for both orthogonal and parallel processes, different time intervals were allowed to elapse between treatment and surface energy measurement to determine how long the treatment remains effective before the energy begins to decrease. For the materials tested, we present comparisons of surface energy for different plasma flow directions and exposure times, and discuss the post-treatment longevity of the elevated surface energies.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Stainless Steel Modification Using Cold Plasma Treatment

HUB 302-176

Past studies have demonstrated that increasing the surface energy of metal materials improves their resistance to surface biofilm growth. We investigate surface energy modification with radio frequency-generated cold atmospheric pressure plasma composed of helium and oxygen on various metal surfaces as a means of reducing biofilm growth on metal implants within the body. We treated stainless steel using a commercial Surfx shower head type plasma reactor to determine the dependence of surface energy on the direction of plasma flow (parallel versus orthogonal to the surface) and on exposure time. Water droplet contact angle was used as a measure of surface energy and plasma molecular spectra were measured with a spectrometer throughout treatment to monitor the concentrations of reactive oxygen species which are known to prevent bacterial growth. Once the treatment times required to reach maximum surface energy levels were determined for both orthogonal and parallel processes, different time intervals were allowed to elapse between treatment and surface energy measurement to determine how long the treatment remains effective before the energy begins to decrease. For the materials tested, we present comparisons of surface energy for different plasma flow directions and exposure times, and discuss the post-treatment longevity of the elevated surface energies.