Presentation Title

Determining the Optimal Induction Method of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis for RNA Sequencing.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-78

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Authors: Sonia Iyengar, Youstina Salama, Lisa Golden

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that causes neurodegeneration of the central nervous system (CNS). Sex hormones and chromosomes influence sexual dimorphism in MS, where females are more susceptible and males experience greater neurodegeneration. Our project explores differences between XX and XY chromosome complements in the CNS using a mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the Four Core Genotypes (FCG). We will use high throughput RNA sequencing to find differentially expressed X genes between XX and XY in health and disease. Previous studies show differences in XX and XY chromosome complements of the immune system during EAE. This makes it difficult to study sex chromosome differences in the CNS independently. The current method to separate the two systems during EAE is bone marrow chimera (BMC). However, radiation exposure will mildly affect gene expression patterns. An alternative method for EAE, adoptive transfer, utilizes stimulated donor immune cells to drive disease induction and progression, although, the degree of host immune cell involvement is uncertain. Here, we investigated which method will best allow us to study gene expression profiles of the CNS independent from the immune system during EAE. In the presented experiments, all donor and recipient mice have distinct immune markers which allow us to analyze both methods via flow cytometry. We determine the percentage of host and donated cells in the given system and conclude that BMC is the best method.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Determining the Optimal Induction Method of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis for RNA Sequencing.

HUB 302-78

Authors: Sonia Iyengar, Youstina Salama, Lisa Golden

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that causes neurodegeneration of the central nervous system (CNS). Sex hormones and chromosomes influence sexual dimorphism in MS, where females are more susceptible and males experience greater neurodegeneration. Our project explores differences between XX and XY chromosome complements in the CNS using a mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the Four Core Genotypes (FCG). We will use high throughput RNA sequencing to find differentially expressed X genes between XX and XY in health and disease. Previous studies show differences in XX and XY chromosome complements of the immune system during EAE. This makes it difficult to study sex chromosome differences in the CNS independently. The current method to separate the two systems during EAE is bone marrow chimera (BMC). However, radiation exposure will mildly affect gene expression patterns. An alternative method for EAE, adoptive transfer, utilizes stimulated donor immune cells to drive disease induction and progression, although, the degree of host immune cell involvement is uncertain. Here, we investigated which method will best allow us to study gene expression profiles of the CNS independent from the immune system during EAE. In the presented experiments, all donor and recipient mice have distinct immune markers which allow us to analyze both methods via flow cytometry. We determine the percentage of host and donated cells in the given system and conclude that BMC is the best method.