Presentation Title

Synthesis Approaches for Highly Dispersed Single Platinum Atoms on a Metal Oxide Support

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-135

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Supported metal catalysts are important materials in the petrochemical, pharmaceutical, and energy industries due to their ability to continuously drive chemical conversions that demand high production. In recent years, a lively debate of active single-atom [catalysts] has flourished in academia. Single atom catalysts allow for 100% metal utilization, representing a prime opportunity to advance the field of catalysis, though their catalytic activity is still in question. In pursuit of synthesizing single atom catalysts, extremely small quantities of the precursor, TAPN (tetraamine platinum nitrate), were strategically deposited onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles (5nm in diameter) by two distinct straightforward techniques: Dry Impregnation and Strong Electrostatic Adsorption. Dry Impregnation (DI), the simplest approach, is the process by which catalytic metal ions are deposited onto a support using capillary action to distribute the catalytic metal and fill the supports pores. Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA) manipulates the distribution of the catalytic metal via Coulombic attraction. Carbon monoxide was used as a probe molecule to uniquely identify isolated Pt atoms and nanoparticles using IR spectroscopy. Using the DI method, a mixture of single Pt atoms and nanoparticles were successfully produced. While SEA, which was not fully developed, resulted in only nanoparticles although it has since proved much better results than DI as originally hypothesized.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Synthesis Approaches for Highly Dispersed Single Platinum Atoms on a Metal Oxide Support

HUB 302-135

Supported metal catalysts are important materials in the petrochemical, pharmaceutical, and energy industries due to their ability to continuously drive chemical conversions that demand high production. In recent years, a lively debate of active single-atom [catalysts] has flourished in academia. Single atom catalysts allow for 100% metal utilization, representing a prime opportunity to advance the field of catalysis, though their catalytic activity is still in question. In pursuit of synthesizing single atom catalysts, extremely small quantities of the precursor, TAPN (tetraamine platinum nitrate), were strategically deposited onto the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles (5nm in diameter) by two distinct straightforward techniques: Dry Impregnation and Strong Electrostatic Adsorption. Dry Impregnation (DI), the simplest approach, is the process by which catalytic metal ions are deposited onto a support using capillary action to distribute the catalytic metal and fill the supports pores. Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA) manipulates the distribution of the catalytic metal via Coulombic attraction. Carbon monoxide was used as a probe molecule to uniquely identify isolated Pt atoms and nanoparticles using IR spectroscopy. Using the DI method, a mixture of single Pt atoms and nanoparticles were successfully produced. While SEA, which was not fully developed, resulted in only nanoparticles although it has since proved much better results than DI as originally hypothesized.