Presentation Title

Characterizing the role of CREB target genes in Th17 cells

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-71

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The CREB/CRTC2 pathway has been known to regulate autoimmune diseases by promoting Th17 cell differentiation. Th17 cells secrete IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines that are associated with tissue inflammation in several autoimmune diseases. The CREB/CRTC2 pathway stimulates IL-17A and IL-17F production in Th17 cells. Using RNAseq analysis from Th17 cells treated with the cAMP agonist, forskolin, we have identified CREB target genes categorized in two groups: Cell surface receptors and mitochondrial/metabolic genes. For cell surface receptors, we identified GPR65, GPR171 Ccr7 while for mitochondrial/metabolic genes we identified Hif1α, Ndrg1, Sod1 and Rgs2 as CREB targets. By characterizing CREB targets, we can better understand Th17 cell development and function. By understanding how these genes regulate Th17 cell function, we hope to be able to manipulate Th17 cells with drugs to treat patients with autoimmune diseases.

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Characterizing the role of CREB target genes in Th17 cells

HUB 302-71

The CREB/CRTC2 pathway has been known to regulate autoimmune diseases by promoting Th17 cell differentiation. Th17 cells secrete IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines that are associated with tissue inflammation in several autoimmune diseases. The CREB/CRTC2 pathway stimulates IL-17A and IL-17F production in Th17 cells. Using RNAseq analysis from Th17 cells treated with the cAMP agonist, forskolin, we have identified CREB target genes categorized in two groups: Cell surface receptors and mitochondrial/metabolic genes. For cell surface receptors, we identified GPR65, GPR171 Ccr7 while for mitochondrial/metabolic genes we identified Hif1α, Ndrg1, Sod1 and Rgs2 as CREB targets. By characterizing CREB targets, we can better understand Th17 cell development and function. By understanding how these genes regulate Th17 cell function, we hope to be able to manipulate Th17 cells with drugs to treat patients with autoimmune diseases.