Presentation Title

Novel Beating Cardiac Cell and Pacemaker Macrostructures Produced on 3-D Printed Substrates of Fibrin

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#137

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Regenerative cardiac repair in human clinical trials has demonstrated that a patient’s own cardiac cells differentiated in vitro and transplanted autologously can dramatically improve cardiac function. The human heart's electrically responsive muscle tissue can now be extracted, expanded in culture, and returned to the patient as therapy. However, the scale of current autologous transplanted tissue remains microscopic and pacemaker tissue is lacking. The objective of this project is to reprogram a P19.CL6 stem cell line to divide into beating cardiac macrostructures. For two decades, cardiogenesis from pluripotent P19 mouse cells has been induced by DMSO via the Wnt signal transduction pathway. In addition, fibrin has been previously found to support cardiogenesis in vivo. In this project, we hypothesize that specifically engineered three-dimensional beating cardiac structures could derive from the combination of mouse stem cells growing on a fibrin matrix. Our experiments produced functional, macroscopic beating tissue that contains its own pacemaker. These results showed that lab grown beating tissue is useful as a model for myocardial infarction and repair. The histologically, cardiac cells grow slowly as characteristically rectangular cells which beat after 14 days. These cells continued to grow slowly on fibrin matrices over the course of three months into ropelike, parallel, striated tissue superstructures. Collectively, the results demonstrated the potential of the beating cardiac tissue to be specifically shaped into functional beating structures. Larger beating tissues are proposed to be used in humans as material for heart repair.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Novel Beating Cardiac Cell and Pacemaker Macrostructures Produced on 3-D Printed Substrates of Fibrin

HUB 302-#137

Regenerative cardiac repair in human clinical trials has demonstrated that a patient’s own cardiac cells differentiated in vitro and transplanted autologously can dramatically improve cardiac function. The human heart's electrically responsive muscle tissue can now be extracted, expanded in culture, and returned to the patient as therapy. However, the scale of current autologous transplanted tissue remains microscopic and pacemaker tissue is lacking. The objective of this project is to reprogram a P19.CL6 stem cell line to divide into beating cardiac macrostructures. For two decades, cardiogenesis from pluripotent P19 mouse cells has been induced by DMSO via the Wnt signal transduction pathway. In addition, fibrin has been previously found to support cardiogenesis in vivo. In this project, we hypothesize that specifically engineered three-dimensional beating cardiac structures could derive from the combination of mouse stem cells growing on a fibrin matrix. Our experiments produced functional, macroscopic beating tissue that contains its own pacemaker. These results showed that lab grown beating tissue is useful as a model for myocardial infarction and repair. The histologically, cardiac cells grow slowly as characteristically rectangular cells which beat after 14 days. These cells continued to grow slowly on fibrin matrices over the course of three months into ropelike, parallel, striated tissue superstructures. Collectively, the results demonstrated the potential of the beating cardiac tissue to be specifically shaped into functional beating structures. Larger beating tissues are proposed to be used in humans as material for heart repair.