Presentation Title

Quantitative measurements of active Ionian volcanoes in Galileo NIMS data

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#156

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The Galileo Satellite observed Io and the rest of the Jupiter system from 1995-2003. The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) was capable of scanning 408 wavelength spectrum ranging from 0.7 – 5.2 μm measuring reflected sunlight and thermal emission. Images of Io were obtained at observation distances from 244,000 to 860,000 km corresponding to spatial resolution of 122 to 430 km per NIMS pixel. The goal for this research is to systematically determine the temperature and area of all volcanic sources observed by NIMS. The first step is that I determine the location of the volcanoes in a NIMS image. To ensure it is a real volcano, I observe the spectrum to make sure it looks like a blackbody. I then determine the temperature and area of the blackbody that best fits the spectral data. In order to test this methodology, I am comparing my results to those of previous researchers. Once the methodology is verified, I will search every NIMS dataset, including those not used by other researchers. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine how volcanoes on Io vary in time and space.

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Quantitative measurements of active Ionian volcanoes in Galileo NIMS data

HUB 302-#156

The Galileo Satellite observed Io and the rest of the Jupiter system from 1995-2003. The Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) was capable of scanning 408 wavelength spectrum ranging from 0.7 – 5.2 μm measuring reflected sunlight and thermal emission. Images of Io were obtained at observation distances from 244,000 to 860,000 km corresponding to spatial resolution of 122 to 430 km per NIMS pixel. The goal for this research is to systematically determine the temperature and area of all volcanic sources observed by NIMS. The first step is that I determine the location of the volcanoes in a NIMS image. To ensure it is a real volcano, I observe the spectrum to make sure it looks like a blackbody. I then determine the temperature and area of the blackbody that best fits the spectral data. In order to test this methodology, I am comparing my results to those of previous researchers. Once the methodology is verified, I will search every NIMS dataset, including those not used by other researchers. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine how volcanoes on Io vary in time and space.