Presentation Title

Graphene Synthesis Using Chemical Vapor Deposition and Characterization with Scanning Electron Microscopy

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-170

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Graphene – a hexagonal-structured monolayer of carbon atoms – is an extremely strong and conducive material, which is also remarkably flexible and transparent. Since the isolation of a single-layer of graphene in 2004, the research and developments for electronics and energy applications rapidly developed, and led to the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. Although the graphene that was isolated using the Laureates’ technique of mechanical exfoliation is of very high quality, its size and location of deposition is unpredictable. In order to produce large-area graphene that is compatible with conventional top-down semiconductor fabrication processes, we synthesized graphene on sheets of copper using Chemical Vapor Deposition. Three gases: Argon, Methane, and Hydrogen were used throughout the process at controlled flow rates. The effect of changing the growth time of was investigated. With short growth time, hexagonal-shaped single crystal graphene was observed under scanning electron microscope. With increasing growth time, the single crystal graphene connects with each other and forms continuous coverage throughout copper surface. In conclusion, graphene of centimeter scale was successfully synthesized that covered the entire copper substrate. The sample was observed under an optical microscope, and the nanoscale structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Further work is ongoing to define optimal parameters to synthesize large area uniform single layer graphene for electrical and sensing applications.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Graphene Synthesis Using Chemical Vapor Deposition and Characterization with Scanning Electron Microscopy

HUB 302-170

Graphene – a hexagonal-structured monolayer of carbon atoms – is an extremely strong and conducive material, which is also remarkably flexible and transparent. Since the isolation of a single-layer of graphene in 2004, the research and developments for electronics and energy applications rapidly developed, and led to the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. Although the graphene that was isolated using the Laureates’ technique of mechanical exfoliation is of very high quality, its size and location of deposition is unpredictable. In order to produce large-area graphene that is compatible with conventional top-down semiconductor fabrication processes, we synthesized graphene on sheets of copper using Chemical Vapor Deposition. Three gases: Argon, Methane, and Hydrogen were used throughout the process at controlled flow rates. The effect of changing the growth time of was investigated. With short growth time, hexagonal-shaped single crystal graphene was observed under scanning electron microscope. With increasing growth time, the single crystal graphene connects with each other and forms continuous coverage throughout copper surface. In conclusion, graphene of centimeter scale was successfully synthesized that covered the entire copper substrate. The sample was observed under an optical microscope, and the nanoscale structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Further work is ongoing to define optimal parameters to synthesize large area uniform single layer graphene for electrical and sensing applications.